Ten Thousand Worlds

<< Return · Version 1.03, June 2016

 

 

Opening Words

From the Author / Illustrator

This is a game, meant to make a rainy afternoon more enjoyable for you and a few friends. This game requires you to use your imagination. If you have trouble telling the difference between fantasy and reality, then this game is not for you.

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Introduction

Basic Game Concepts

The Game

Ten Thousand Worlds is a game that lets you and your friends exercise your creativity and imagination as you work together to experience a story in the great tradition of heroic fiction —a story that you create yourselves. All players, save one, play the roles of the story’s fictional heroes, the Player Characters (PCsPlayer Characters for short), and try to “save the day” as the heroes would. The remaining player, the Game Master (or GMGame Master) plays the roles of all the other characters they meet: villains, monsters, everyday people and animals; collectively known as Non Player Characters (NPCsNon Player Characters). The GMGame Master also acts as referee and sets up every new game session, or chapter in the story. Together, everyone’s choices shape a collaborative, interactive tale.

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The Basics

What You Need to Play

To play this game, you need these rules, paper and pencils for recording information about your story, plus a few dice. You can use ten-sided or six-sided dice; If you don’t own dice, you can use coins. Whichever you choose to use, all players must use the same type of dice or coins.

Traits & Levels

Almost everything in the story’s world can be described by its traits, and each trait comes in various levels: from Dreadful (the worst), to Common (average), to Wondrous (the best). For example, most walls are described by one trait, their Material trait; a wall made of Dreadful Material is weaker and easier to damage than a wall of Common Material, which in turn is weaker than a wall of Wondrous Material. As seen in Table 1: Levels, each level is associated with a dice roll modifier and a point value, which become important later in the rules.

Table 1: Levels
Level Level Abbreviation Modifier Value
Dreadful Dr -3 1
Weak Wk -2 2
Poor Pr -1 4
Common Cm 0 6
Good Gd +1 10
Great Gr +2 15
Outstanding Ou +3 20
Extraordinary Ex +4 30
Phenomenal Ph +5 40
Fantastic Fa +6 60
Wondrous Wo +7 100

A shorthand way of showing all this is:

Trait: Level(modifier)(value)

— or —

Trait: Level Abbreviation(modifier)(value)

So for example, a wall’s Great Material trait may be written:

Material: Great(+2)(15)

— or —

Material: Gr(+2)(15)Great(+2)(15)

Any particular level is roughly one and a half times bigger / stronger / better than the level just beneath it, so Good(+1)(10) ends up being about 10 times better than Dreadful(-3)(1), and Wondrous(+7)(100) ends up being about 10 times better than Good(+1)(10), or about 100 times better than Dreadful(-3)(1).

What DreadfulDreadful(-3)(1) actually means depends on the trait. Table 2: Dreadful Level shows that for some traits, such as the Weight trait, Dr(-3)(1)Dreadful(-3)(1) is a measurable amount, while for others, such as the Visibility trait, it’s a bit more abstract. These traits and others have their own tables later in the rules that give examples of what different levels mean for different traits.

Table 2: Dreadful Level
Example Trait Dreadful(-3)(1) Level
Weight 20 kg (40 lbs)
Distance / Range 20 m (60 ft)
Speed 12 kph (7.5 mph), 20 meters in 6 seconds
Information 1 MB (one megabyte), one book
Material Cardboard, cellulose
Visibility Starlight on a moonless night
Temperature Near-freezing
Acidity / Basicity Pure water
Fire One match
Orders of Magnitude

So what if you want a story where everyone rides inside giant robots battling building-size monsters, and even the weakest robot is ten times stronger than most humans? For that kind of story, levels for some of the traits of robots and monsters jump another order of magnitude, to Magnitude 1 (or M1Magnitude 1), where all levels are ten times better than normal. A monster’s GoodGood(+1)(10) Strength trait at Magnitude 1 may be written—

Strength: Magnitude 1 \ Good(+1)(10)

— or —

Strength: M1Magnitude 1 \ Gd(+1)(10)Good(+1)(10)

—to show that it is ten times better than a GoodGood(+1)(10) Strength trait at the default magnitude, Magnitude 0 (or M0Magnitude 0). Being the default, “M0Magnitude 0 \” doesn’t need to be written in front of a level.

There are higher orders of magnitude beyond M1Magnitude 1, each one 10 times better than the one below it. M2Magnitude 2 \ GdGood Strength is 10 times better than M1Magnitude 1 \ GdGood Strength and 100 times better than M0Magnitude 0 \ Gd(+1)(10)Good(+1)(10) Strength, or 1000 times better than M0Magnitude 0 \ Dr(-3)(1)Dreadful(-3)(1).

Table 3: Expanded Levels shows there is some overlap in the different orders of magnitude. Phenomenal level is equal to Poor level, Fantastic is equal to Common, and Wondrous equals Good at the next higher order of magnitude.

Table 3: Expanded Levels
Magnitude 0   Magnitude 1   Magnitude 2   Magnitude 3   Magnitude 4
M0Magnitude 0 \ Dr(-3)(1)Dreadful(-3)(1)                
M0Magnitude 0 \ Wk(-2)(2)Weak(-2)(2)                
M0Magnitude 0 \ Pr(-1)(4)Poor(-1)(4)                
M0Magnitude 0 \ Cm(0)(6)Common(0)(6)                
M0Magnitude 0 \ Gd(+1)(10)Good(+1)(10)                
M0Magnitude 0 \ Gr(+2)(15)Great(+2)(15)                
M0Magnitude 0 \ Ou(+3)(20)Outstanding(+3)(20)                
M0Magnitude 0 \ Ex(+4)(30)Extraordinary(+4)(30)                
M0Magnitude 0 \ Ph(+5)(40)Phenomenal(+5)(40) = M1Magnitude 1 \ Pr(-1)(4)Poor(-1)(4)            
M0Magnitude 0 \ Fa(+6)(60)Fantastic(+6)(60) = M1Magnitude 1 \ Cm(0)(6)Common(0)(6)            
M0Magnitude 0 \ Wo(+7)(100)Wondrous(+7)(100) = M1Magnitude 1 \ Gd(+1)(10)Good(+1)(10)            
    M1Magnitude 1 \ Gr(+2)(15)Great(+2)(15)            
    M1Magnitude 1 \ Ou(+3)(20)Outstanding(+3)(20)            
    M1Magnitude 1 \ Ex(+4)(30)Extraordinary(+4)(30)            
    M1Magnitude 1 \ Ph(+5)(40)Phenomenal(+5)(40) = M2Magnitude 2 \ Pr(-1)(4)Poor(-1)(4)        
    M1Magnitude 1 \ Fa(+6)(60)Fantastic(+6)(60) = M2Magnitude 2 \ Cm(0)(6)Common(0)(6)        
    M1Magnitude 1 \ Wo(+7)(100)Wondrous(+7)(100) = M2Magnitude 2 \ Gd(+1)(10)Good(+1)(10)        
        M2Magnitude 2 \ Gr(+2)(15)Great(+2)(15)        
        M2Magnitude 2 \ Ou(+3)(20)Outstanding(+3)(20)        
        M2Magnitude 2 \ Ex(+4)(30)Extraordinary(+4)(30)        
        M2Magnitude 2 \ Ph(+5)(40)Phenomenal(+5)(40) = M3Magnitude 3 \ Pr(-1)(4)Poor(-1)(4)    
        M2Magnitude 2 \ Fa(+6)(60)Fantastic(+6)(60) = M3Magnitude 3 \ Cm(0)(6)Common(0)(6)    
        M2Magnitude 2 \ Wo(+7)(100)Wondrous(+7)(100) = M3Magnitude 3 \ Gd(+1)(10)Good(+1)(10)    
            M3Magnitude 3 \ Gr(+2)(15)Great(+2)(15)    
            M3Magnitude 3 \ Ou(+3)(20)Outstanding(+3)(20)    
            M3Magnitude 3 \ Ex(+4)(30)Extraordinary(+4)(30)    
            M3Magnitude 3 \ Ph(+5)(40)Phenomenal(+5)(40) = M4Magnitude 4 \ Pr(-1)(4)Poor(-1)(4)
            M3Magnitude 3 \ Fa(+6)(60)Fantastic(+6)(60) = M4Magnitude 4 \ Cm(0)(6)Common(0)(6)
            M3Magnitude 3 \ Wo(+7)(100)Wondrous(+7)(100) = M4Magnitude 4 \ Gd(+1)(10)Good(+1)(10)
                M4Magnitude 4 \ Gr(+2)(15)Great(+2)(15)
                M4Magnitude 4 \ Ou(+3)(20)Outstanding(+3)(20)
                M4Magnitude 4 \ Ex(+4)(30)Extraordinary(+4)(30)
                M4Magnitude 4 \ Ph(+5)(40)Phenomenal(+5)(40)
                M4Magnitude 4 \ Fa(+6)(60)Fantastic(+6)(60)
                M4Magnitude 4 \ Wo(+7)(100)Wondrous(+7)(100)
When Worlds Collide

So what happens if a trait from a higher order of magnitude acts on a trait from a lower order of magnitude, such as when a giant robot with M1Magnitude 1 \ Outstanding(+3)(20) Strength stubs its toe against a garden wall of M0Magnitude 0 \ Great(+2)(15) Material? Multiply the value of the higher order trait by ten and add six to its modifier. To that garden wall, the giant robot toe has a value of (20 x 10 =) 200 and a modifier of ( (+3) + 6 =) +9. If a gardener wants to “scare away” the giant robot before its toe hits his garden wall, by throwing a brick from that wall at it, the reverse happens. When a trait from a lower order of magnitude acts on a trait from a higher order of magnitude, divide the value of the lower order trait by ten (round down) and subtract six from its modifier. To the robot, made of M1Magnitude 1 \ Good(+1)(10) Material, that M0Magnitude 0 \ Great(+2)(15) Material brick has a value of (15 ÷ 10 = 1.5, rounded down =) 1 and a modifier of ( (+1) - 6 =) -5. The outcome of such an action, and many others, is explained later in Action!.

 

When a lower magnitude trait acts on a higher magnitude trait:

divide its point value by 10 (round down)

subtract 6 from its dice roll modifier

When a higher magnitude trait acts on a lower magnitude trait:

multiply its point value by 10

add 6 to its dice roll modifier

Rolling The Dice: Simple Rolls

There are two ways to roll dice in this game: the Action Roll (or ARAction Roll), explained later in Action!, and the Simple Roll (or SRSimple Roll). To make a Simple Roll, just roll one die and take the resulting number. If you’re using coins, flip one coin; If it lands front-side up, flip it again, and keep flipping it until it lands reverse-side up; Then count up every time you flipped it to get your number. Sometimes a Simple Roll needs to be multiplied by some number. The shorthand way of showing this is:

SRSimple RollxNumber

So a Simple Roll that gets multiplied by 10 may be written:

SRSimple Rollx10

Sometimes a Simple Roll needs to be added to the modifier for some trait. The shorthand way to show this is:

SRSimple Roll+Trait

For example, if you need to make a Simple Roll and add it to the modifier for a PC’sPlayer Character’s Perception trait (a trait they all have, explained in Building Characters), it may be written:

SRSimple Roll+Perception

Turns

Time in the story moves as quickly or slowly as needed to tell your tale. If nothing important happens to your character during her 45 minute ferry boat passage to an island, the GMGame Master will just fast-forward the story to her arrival. On the other hand, if she needs to evade pursuers until the boat docks, or the ferry gets attacked by pirates / aliens / sea monsters, time slows down into turns. One turn equals six seconds in the story. In one turn, any character could:

  • Move at top speed
  • Move at half of top speed and take one action,

    including stopping a wounded companion from dying

  • Stay in place and try to take multiple actions
Who Goes First

When things start happening turn by turn, the GMGame Master first determines the sides involved, e.g.: your team vs. the villains, three different armadas, or everyone for himself. Next, the GMGame Master has the leader of each side —or everyone in a free-for-all— make an SRSimple Roll+Perception. The highest number goes first, the next highest goes second, and so on, with ties rolling again. For example, if one leader has Great(+2)(15) Perception and gets a 3 on her Simple Roll, that’s a ( (+2) + 3 =) +5; If the leader for the other side has Poor(-1)(4) Perception and gets a 6 on his Simple Roll that’s ( (-1) + 6 =) +5; Both sides tie and must roll again. The GMGame Master can opt to do this every turn, only when the sides change (e.g.: one armada splits into two attack groups), or just at the start of every conflict.

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The Rest of the Rules

So far, you’ve learned about describing things in the story by their Traits & Levels, how to make Simple Rolls, when to take Turns, and how to determine Who Goes First. The rest of these rules come in two parts. The first part helps you build characters and objects for a story and referee their interactions:

  • Building Characters: Describes all the different traits that define a character in the game.
  • Action!: How your PCPlayer Character interacts with the story, from how he smooth-talks his way past a doorman to how he can climb a wall or land a punch.
  • Improving Characters: How your character can raise the levels of her traits and gain new abilities if she is successful and stays true to the heroic ideal.
  • Gear: How to build everything from magic swords to sportscars to spaceships; all the tools of the heroic trade.

The second section is full of resources:

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An Example of Play

Veronica, Darius, and Chris have regrouped at Veronica’s home after a downpour prematurely ended their game in the park. Now drier and warmer, they decide to spend what’s left of their afternoon playing Ten Thousand Worlds. They pull out their notes on the story, dice, pencils, and blank paper, then gather around a table. Veronica, acting as Game Master, picks up the story where they left off…

Veronica: “At the end of the previous chapter, the criminal who signs his demands as the ‘Dream Weaver’ had managed to evade both the dashing detective…”

Darius: (groans)

Veronica: “…the tough-as-nails supernatural sleuth, Max Behr, and white-hat hacker turned reluctant heroine, R3D, but not before leaving behind a marked-up copy of the PATH underground sidewalk map for downtown. We open this chapter with Max and R3D standing in the middle of a now-empty side street in Little India. The sticky filaments of the strange ‘glue bomb’ have finally dissolved and they are now free, as is the map that became entangled with them. What do Max and R3D do now?”

Chris (playing R3D): “R3D studies the map.”

Darius (playing Max Behr): “Max decides to see if any of his ‘little buddies’ are around, just in case they saw which way the Dream Weaver left.”

Veronica: “The map R3D studies is the usual thing handed out to tourists every day. Different buildings on the map are marked with circles, there are a few clustered triangles at some intersections, and a big ‘X’ under the Convention Centre. As for Max, a trio of frightened faerie folk huddled under R3D’s Cybercycle take one look at his expression and say, ‘He went that way!’, each pointing in a different direction.”

Darius: “Max says, ‘Faeries! The Silvery Realm is a bust, you get anything, whiz-kid?’.”

Chris: “R3D replies, ‘Except for the way-too-obvious mark by the Convention Centre, no. I could go online…‘.“

Darius: “Max interrupts: ‘Or just charge into X-marks-the-spot.’.”

Chris: “R3D says, ‘Classic Behr. Since we’re fresh out of clues, it’s as good a place as any to start. Come on, I’ll give you a ride over there on my bike’. We head for the ‘X’.”

Veronica: “I’ll fast-forward. Between traffic and crowds, in two hours you’re both standing in a little used Convention Centre side-passage in front of a broken-open maintenance panel.”

Darius: “Max whips out his gun and goes in …”

Chris (cutting off Darius): “R3D says, ‘Wait, first look for …’”

Veronica (cutting off both): “Too late. Max: You’re in the dark and hear, ‘He fell for it?’. R3D: You see that panel slam shut and hear footsteps behind you. It seems we have at least four sides trying to act. Time to see who goes first. Darius and Chris, roll separately for Max and R3D, and I’ll roll for … well, you’ll see.”

And the story continues…

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Building Characters

You build a PCPlayer Character (or any other character) for a story by starting with a character that has all the traits of a typical modern-day human, then buy higher levels of those traits, plus skills, gear, and perhaps even powers. You buy all of this by spending Character Points. The GMGame Master gives the same number of Character Points to every player; how much depends on the type of story you intend to make together. See the section Sample Player Characters (PCsPlayer Characters) for one possible way to record all the information about the PCsPlayer Characters you build.

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Character Points

If everyone wants to have a story where PCsPlayer Characters are just slightly better prepared for danger and adventure than the average person, the GMGame Master may hand out 500-1000 Character Points to each player. If the story will feature heroes that can each take on several evil henchmen at once, or have a special power or two, the GMGame Master may give out 1000-2000 Character Points. If your heroes will be the stuff of Wuxia movies, sword-and-sorcery novels, or comic books, the GMGame Master may give out 2000-5000 points or more. On the other hand, the GMGame Master may give out very few points on purpose, because everyone wants to tell a story where the heroes start humble and work towards greatness.

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Character Traits

All characters are described by the same set of traits:

Brawling - How well your character attacks and defends in hand-to-hand combat. The typical modern-day human with no combat training has Poor(-1)(4) Brawling.

Agility - How well your character attacks and defends in combat from a distance, throws and catches, keeps her balance, and performs tasks that require hand-eye coordination. A typical modern-day human has Common(0)(6) Agility.

Strength - How much damage your character can inflict in hand-to-hand combat, and how much he can lift. Typical humans have Common(0)(6) Strength.

Endurance - Your character’s ability to do strenuous work or run for extended periods of time, hold her breath, and resist toxins, stunning, and knock-out punches. Humans average a Common(0)(6) Endurance.

Willpower - How well your character resists psychological manipulation and mind-control, how well he attacks and defends in mental combat, and how much he gets his way in negotiations and social situations. The typical modern-day human with no mental training has Poor(-1)(4) Willpower.

Intelligence - Your character’s ability to reason, build things, and come to understand new technologies. Typical humans have Common(0)(6) Intelligence.

Perception - How quickly your character can make or react to attacks, notice something out-of-place, and do tasks that require sharp senses. Humans have Common(0)(6) Perception.

Resourcefulness - Your character’s ability to get something she needs through the use of money, power, influence, hunting, or gathering; and her number of Contacts. The typical modern-day human has Dr(-3)(1)Dreadful(-3)(1) Resourcefulness.

Reputation - The “honor”, “name”, or “renown” earned by your character for his heroic deeds. It influences the reactions of those who recognize him. This special trait cannot be improved by spending Character Points. All starting characters have a DreadfulDreadful(-3)(1) Reputation —that is, none at all— but can earn levels of Reputation at the end of a chapter (see Improving Characters). Villains and supernatural creatures of “pure evil” have the Evil Reputation trait instead of a normal Reputation trait. If your character uses an alias, cover, or secret identity, each identity will have a separate Reputation.

Health Points & Story Points

Besides Character Points, characters get two other types of points:

Health Points - Add together the values of your character’s Brawling, Agility, Strength, and Endurance traits to get her Health Points. This is the amount of damage your character can take before she starts to die. They can go up and down throughout a chapter as your character gets injured or heals.

Story Points - Add together the values of your character’s Willpower, Intelligence, Perception, and Resourcefulness traits to get his starting Story Points. They can be spent in the middle of a chapter to improve a Action Number (see Action!). They’re also the maximum number of Story Points he can use in any given chapter. After these points are spent, you can buy more, between chapters, by spending Character Points.

Table 4: Typical Modern-Day Humans
Trait Level
Brawling: Poor(-1)(4)
Agility: Common(0)(6)
Strength: Common(0)(6)
Endurance: Common(0)(6)
Willpower: Poor(-1)(4)
Intelligence: Common(0)(6)
Perception: Common(0)(6)
Resourcefulness: Dr(-3)(1)Dreadful(-3)(1)
Reputation: Dr(-3)(1)Dreadful(-3)(1)
Health Points: 22
Story Points: 17
Table 5: Brawling
Level Example
Wk(-2)(2)Weak(-2)(2) Human child
Pr(-1)(4)Poor(-1)(4) Typical modern-day human
Cm(0)(6)Common(0)(6) Student of self-defense
Gd(+1)(10)Good(+1)(10) Modern-day police officer
Gr(+2)(15)Great(+2)(15) Modern-day soldier
Ou(+3)(20)Outstanding(+3)(20) Modern-day elite combat trooper
Ex(+4)(30)Extraordinary(+4)(30) Martial arts master
Ph(+5)(40)Phenomenal(+5)(40) Human limit
Table 6: Agility
Level Example
Cm(0)(6)Common(0)(6) Typical modern-day human
Gr(+2)(15)Great(+2)(15) Modern-day champion marksman
Ou(+3)(20)Outstanding(+3)(20) Modern-day champion gymnast
Ex(+4)(30)Extraordinary(+4)(30) Human limit
Table 7: Strength
Level Example
Dr(-3)(1)Dreadful(-3)(1) Human child
Cm(0)(6)Common(0)(6) Typical modern-day human
Gr(+2)(15)Great(+2)(15) Modern-day champion weight-lifter
Ou(+3)(20)Outstanding(+3)(20) Human limit
Table 8: Endurance
Level Example
Cm(0)(6)Common(0)(6) Typical modern-day human
Gr(+2)(15)Great(+2)(15) Modern-day champion athlete
Ou(+3)(20)Outstanding(+3)(20) Yoga master; Human limit
Table 9: Willpower
Level Example
Pr(-1)(4)Poor(-1)(4) Typical modern-day human
Cm(0)(6)Common(0)(6) Bazaar merchant, negotiator, or debater
Gd(+1)(10)Good(+1)(10) Trained to resist interrogation, hypnosis, or mind-control
Ou(+3)(20)Outstanding(+3)(20) Bodhi; Human limit for stories that are not fantasy or horror
Table 10: Intelligence
Level Example
Cm(0)(6)Common(0)(6) Operate typical technology of the era; Typical modern-day human
Gd(+1)(10)Good(+1)(10) Repair technology of the era
Gr(+2)(15)Great(+2)(15) Make and modify technology of the era
Ou(+3)(20)Outstanding(+3)(20) Develop advanced technology for the era
Ex(+4)(30)Extraordinary(+4)(30) Understand technology beyond the era or from an alien culture
Table 11: Perception
Level Example
Cm(0)(6)Common(0)(6) Typical modern-day human
Gd(+1)(10)Good(+1)(10) Modern-day detective
Gr(+2)(15)Great(+2)(15) Tracker for human hunter-gatherer tribe
Ou(+3)(20)Outstanding(+3)(20) Animals that track and hunt
Ph(+5)(40)Phenomenal(+5)(40) Zen master; Human limit
Table 12: Resourcefulness
Level Example
Dr(-3)(1)Dreadful(-3)(1) Abject poverty; Typical modern-day human
Wk(-2)(2)Weak(-2)(2) Pensioner, retiree, migrant worker, or unemployed in a modern-day industrialized nation
Pr(-1)(4)Poor(-1)(4) Student or service industry worker in a modern-day industrialized nation
Cm(0)(6)Common(0)(6) Middle class office or factory worker in a modern-day industrialized nation
Gd(+1)(10)Good(+1)(10) Upper-middle class professional in a modern-day industrialized nation
Gr(+2)(15)Great(+2)(15) Small modern-day company; Upper class professional in a modern-day industrialized nation
Ou(+3)(20)Outstanding(+3)(20) Large modern-day company
Ex(+4)(30)Extraordinary(+4)(30) Modern-day extremely wealthy individual
Ph(+5)(40)Phenomenal(+5)(40) Small modern-day industrialized nation
Fa(+6)(60)Fantastic(+6)(60) Large modern-day industrialized nation
Wo(+7)(100)Wondrous(+7)(100) Modern-day multi-national corporation
M1Magnitude 1 \ Gr(+2)(15)Great(+2)(15) One of the ten wealthiest nations on Earth
Buying Levels of Traits

To raise a trait by one level, you must spend a number of Character Points equal to twice the value of the next higher level. To raise Cm(0)(6)Common(0)(6) Strength to Gd(+1)(10)Good(+1)(10) Strength, you must spend (10 x 2 =) 20 Character Points. To raise a trait by two or more levels, you must spend Character Points equal to the value of each level you jump to get to your new level, plus the value of your new level, times two. Raising Cm(0)(6)Common(0)(6) Strength to Ou(+3)(20)Outstanding(+3)(20) costs ( (10 + 15 + 20) x 2 =) 90 Character Points. For a below-average trait, add up the values of each level dropped, then multiply by two to find the number of extra Character Points you get back. Dropping Cm(0)(6)Common(0)(6) Strength to Dr(-3)(1)Dreadful(-3)(1), drops past Cm(0)(6)Common(0)(6), Pr(-1)(4)Poor(-1)(4), and Wk(-2)(2)Weak(-2)(2) to give you (6 + 4 + 2) x 2 =) 24 extra Character Points to spend. See Table 5 - Table 12 for examples of different levels of traits.

When raising a trait to a level at a higher order of magnitude, multiply the values of the levels at the higher order of magnitude times ten, times the order of magnitude, before adding them to all the other values. M0Magnitude 0 \ Wo(+7)(100)Wondrous(+7)(100) Strength costs( (10 + 15 + 20 + 30 + 40 + 60 + 100) x 2 =) 550 Character Points, while buying M1Magnitude 1 \ Great(+2)(15) Strength costs you ( (10 + 15 + 20 + 30 + 40 + 60 + 100 + (150 x 10 x 1) ) x 2 =) 850.

Buying Skills

Most skills cost 50 Character Points each. A few special skills count as “double skills”, and cost 100 Character Points. These exceptions are noted in their descriptions.

Buying Gear

Gear costs a number of Character Points equal to the value of the level of its Price trait, plus the value of every level beneath it. To buy an item of Cm(0)(6)Common(0)(6) Price costs (6 + 4 + 2 + 1 =) 12 Character Points. A character can also buy gear by using her Resourcefulness trait, a number of times per month equal to the value of the level of that trait. See Gear for more details.

Buying Powers

If the GMGame Master allows you to buy powers for your character, each power typically costs 500 Character Points. A few powers count as “double powers” and cost 1000 Character Points; these exceptions are noted in their descriptions. But this only gets you a power at Dr(-3)(1)Dreadful(-3)(1) level. You must then spend a number of Character Points equal to the value of the level you want, plus the value of each level you jumped. To buy the Fly power costs 500 points to get it at Dr(-3)(1)Dreadful(-3)(1) level. Great(+2)(15) Fly costs (2 + 4 + 6 + 10 + 15 =) 37 more points, for a total of 537 points.

In addition, you can buy feats, specialized uses of a power that give a character new abilities, for 100 Character Points each. A feat is typically one to three levels lower than the power from which it comes, depending on how much it differs from the power. Examples of possible feats are included in the descriptions of several powers, but the GMGame Master is the final arbiter of whether it makes sense for your character to develop a new feat, or whether you must buy a whole new power.

Limitations

If you don’t have enough Character Points to buy everything you want for your character, you can opt to give him one or more limitations, which can be anything that makes his life more difficult. Taking a limitation gives you extra Character Points to spend. Some power descriptions list possible limitations and Limitation Descriptions has more. Some of the most dangerous powers impose inherent limitations; you don’t earn any points for those. The total Character Points you can get from limitations is equal to half the Character Points given out by the GMGame Master, and any extra points acquired by dropping a trait below average count against this total.

Unused Character Points

If you have any leftover Character Points after you build your character, list them as “Unused Character Points”. Add to these points any Character Points you earn after each chapter. Spend them later to improve your character’s traits, skills, gear, and powers in between chapters (see Improving Characters).

Half the Math is Done for You

To save you time when building a character, the costs of the different levels of traits, gear, and powers, from M0Magnitude 0 \ DreadfulDreadful(-3)(1) through M4Magnitude 4 \ Wondrous, have already been calculated. They are listed in Table 13: Character Point Costs. If you want something at a level beyond M4Magnitude 4 \Wondrous, you’re on your own.

Table 13: Character Point Costs
Level Character Point Costs for Different Traits
Magnitude 0   Magnitude 1   Magnitude 2   Magnitude 3   Magnitude 4

Brawling

Willpower

Agility

Strength

Endurance

Intelligence

Perception

Resource

fulness

Powers Gear
M0Magnitude 0 \ DrDreadful(-3)(1)                 -10 -24 0 0 1
M0Magnitude 0 \ WkWeak(-2)(2)                 -8 -20 4 2 3
M0Magnitude 0 \ PrPoor(-1)(4)                 0 -12 12 6 7
M0Magnitude 0 \ CmCommon(0)(6)                 12 0 24 12 13
M0Magnitude 0 \ GdGood(+1)(10)                 32 20 44 22 23
M0Magnitude 0 \ GrGreat(+2)(15)                 62 50 74 37 38
M0Magnitude 0 \ OuOutstanding(+3)(20)                 102 90 114 57 58
M0Magnitude 0 \ ExExtraordinary(+4)(30)                 162 150 174 87 88
M0Magnitude 0 \ PhPhenomenal(+5)(40) = M1Magnitude 1 \ PrPoor(-1)(4)             242 230 254 127 128
M0Magnitude 0 \ FaFantastic(+6)(60) = M1Magnitude 1 \ CmCommon(0)(6)             362 350 374 187 188
M0Magnitude 0 \ WoWondrous(+7)(100) = M1Magnitude 1 \ GdGood(+1)(10)             562 550 574 287 288
    M1Magnitude 1 \ GrGreat(+2)(15)             862 850 874 437 438
    M1Magnitude 1 \ OuOutstanding(+3)(20)             1,262 1,250 1,274 637 638
    M1Magnitude 1 \ ExExtraordinary(+4)(30)             1,862 1,850 1,874 937 938
    M1Magnitude 1 \ PhPhenomenal(+5)(40) = M2Magnitude 2 \ PrPoor(-1)(4)         2,662 2,650 2,674 1,337 1,338
    M1Magnitude 1 \ FaFantastic(+6)(60) = M2Magnitude 2 \ CmCommon(0)(6)         3,862 3,850 3,874 1,937 1,938
    M1Magnitude 1 \ WoWondrous(+7)(100) = M2Magnitude 2 \ GdGood(+1)(10)         5,862 5,850 5,874 2,937 2,938
        M2Magnitude 2 \ GrGreat(+2)(15)         8,862 8,850 8,874 4,437 4,438
        M2Magnitude 2 \ OuOutstanding(+3)(20)         12,862 12,850 12,874 6,437 6,438
        M2Magnitude 2 \ ExExtraordinary(+4)(30)         18,862 18,850 18,874 9,437 9,438
        M2Magnitude 2 \ PhPhenomenal(+5)(40) = M3Magnitude 3 \ PrPoor(-1)(4)     26,862 26,850 26,874 13,437 13,438
        M2Magnitude 2 \ FaFantastic(+6)(60) = M3Magnitude 3 \ CmCommon(0)(6)     38,862 38,850 38,874 19,437 19,438
        M2Magnitude 2 \ WoWondrous(+7)(100) = M3Magnitude 3 \ GdGood(+1)(10)     58,862 58,850 58,874 29,437 29,438
            M3Magnitude 3 \ GrGreat(+2)(15)     88,862 88,850 88,874 44,437 44,438
            M3Magnitude 3 \ OuOutstanding(+3)(20)     128,862 128,850 128,874 64,437 64,438
            M3Magnitude 3 \ ExExtraordinary(+4)(30)     188,862 188,850 188,874 94,437 94,438
            M3Magnitude 3 \ PhPhenomenal(+5)(40) = M4Magnitude 4 \ PrPoor(-1)(4) 268,862 268,850 268,874 134,437 134,438
            M3Magnitude 3 \ FaFantastic(+6)(60) = M4Magnitude 4 \ CmCommon(0)(6) 388,862 388,850 388,874 194,437 194,438
            M3Magnitude 3 \ WoWondrous(+7)(100) = M4Magnitude 4 \ GdGood(+1)(10) 588,862 588,850 588,874 294,437 294,438
                M4Magnitude 4 \ GrGreat(+2)(15) 888,862 888,850 888,874 444,437 444,438
                M4Magnitude 4 \ OuOutstanding(+3)(20) 1,288,862 1,288,850 1,288,874 644,437 644,438
                M4Magnitude 4 \ ExExtraordinary(+4)(30) 1,888,862 1,888,850 1,888,874 944,437 944,438
                M4Magnitude 4 \ PhPhenomenal(+5)(40) 2,688,862 2,688,850 2,688,874 1,344,437 1,344,438
                M4Magnitude 4 \ FaFantastic(+6)(60) 3,888,862 3,888,850 3,888,874 1,944,437 1,944,438
                M4Magnitude 4 \ WoWondrous(+7)(100) 5,888,862 5,888,850 5,888,874 2,044,437 2,044,438

 

New Skill = 50 character points (100 character points for “double skills”)
New Power = 500 character points (1,000 character points for “double powers”)
New Feat = 100 character points
New Limitation = value of the limitation, given back (half value for limitations that only affect one power)

— Table of Contents —

Filling in the Details

Beyond traits, skills, gear, powers, and limitations, characters are also described by:

Gender & Species - e.g.: “Female Human”, “Male Troll”, “Robot”.

Age, Height, Weight - e.g.: “mid 30’s, 180 cm, 90 kg (6 ft, 200 lbs)”.

Home Base - e.g.: “Modern-day St. Petersburg”, “Ganymede 2112”, “Victorian London in an alternate history where the Babbage Difference Engine is an everyday tool”.

Contacts - People or organizations that your character can call for the occasional favor (and vice versa). A character can have a number of contacts equal to the value of her Resourcefulness trait. Not all contacts need to be defined when a character is built. They can be defined in the middle of a chapter, as needed, subject to GMGame Master approval. Contacts only need to be described by name and a level, e.g.: “Bruno, bouncer at the Midnight Cabaret: GdGood(+1)(10)”, “The Toronto Thaumaturgy Guild: GrGreat(+2)(15)”, “Mr. Chan, Hong Kong taxi driver: CmCommon(0)(6)”, “MI-5: ExExtraordinary(+4)(30)”. That level reflects the resources the contact is able to use on behalf of your character. Contacts can give the character specialized information, occasionally give her access to places and resources not available to the general public, and sometimes let her borrow gear for a short time (one mission). Contacts will not put themselves or their gear at risk without some convincing from the character. Contacts may also ask your character for help with their own problems; the greater the level, the more often this may happen.

Story - The name of the story you are all making together, e.g.: “First Colony on Mars“, “The Unusual and Talented Friends of Lady Fairchild”, “Gunslingers of the Sierra Madre“, “White Fire Coven”, “Chicago After Sundown”.

Optional Details

To help you play your character, you might also want to write down a few notes about how he looks or acts or lives. Does he have olive skin, green eyes, or dreadlocks? Does he dress all in black, have a collection of bad ties, or one favorite hat? Does he have scars or tattoos? Does he adhere to a particular code? Is he constrained by certain taboos or geasa? Does he observe any rituals? Is there a story behind why he’s a hero, reluctant or otherwise? Does he operate under multiple IDs? Do his friends and family know what he does? Do they care?

— Table of Contents —

Action!

Every time your character tries to do anything important in the story, she takes one of two types of actions. When no other characters act to block or oppose her, the action is a check; when they do, it becomes a contest. Both types of actions start with an Action Roll (or ARAction Roll).

Rolling the Dice: The Action Roll

The way you make an Action Roll depends on whether you are playing with coins, six-sided dice, or ten-sided dice. If have coins, toss six coins at once (or flip one coin six times); each coin that lands front-side up counts as one and each coin that lands reverse-side up counts as zero; add up all the ones and zeroes to get a number from 0-6. For six-sided dice, roll three dice (or one die three times) and add together all the numbers from each die rolled to get a number from 3-18. If you are using ten-sided dice, roll one die twice, counting the first roll as a “tens” digit and the second roll as a “ones” digit. If you have two different colored ten-sided dice, you can roll both at once, declaring one color for “tens” and the other for “ones”. If your “tens” roll is 5 and your “ones” roll is 7, that’s 57; If your “tens” is 0 and your “ones” is 3, that’s 03, or 3; If both rolls are 0, that’s 00, or 100.

Once you have a number from your Action Roll, look up its associated action number in Table 14: Action Results. The action number is a base number that may then get modified up or down depending on a variety of factors, to arrive at a final action number and the result level, the level of the character’s success or failure.

Table 14: Action Results

Action Roll

Action Number

Result Level

Six Coins

Three Six-sided Dice

Two Ten-Sided Dice

0

3-4

1

(-3) Dreadful

1

5-6

2-14

(-2) Weak

2

7-8

15-33

(-1) Poor

3

9-12

34-69

(0) Common

4

13-14

70-88

(+1) Good

5

15-16

87-99

(+2) Great

6

17-18

100

(+3) Outstanding

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Checks

For any check, the GMGame Master determines three things:

For example, say Detective Max Behr needs to break down a door. The GMGame Master determines Max’s Gd(+1)(10)Good(+1)(10) Strength trait will be challenged by a wooden door of Pr(-1)(4)Poor(-1)(4) Material, and that there’s nothing unusual about this situation. This gives a trait modifier of (+1), a challenge modifier of (-1), and a situation modifier of (0).

A check is resolved by taking the base action number, adding the trait modifier, plus any situation modifiers, then subtracting the challenge modifier to get the final action number. If the action number falls below (-3), it becomes (-3); if it rises above (+3), it becomes (+3). As seen in Table 14: Action Results, each action number is associated with a result level. For most checks, a GoodGood(+1)(10) result level is enough to succeed, but higher result levels may get better results. A CommonCommon(0)(6) result level usually means nothing changes, for better or worse (the door doesn’t break, but neither does Max’s shoulder). A result of PoorPoor(-1)(4) or worse is a failure, and depending on the action, there could be bad consequences (see Consequences).

Back to our example, say the player for Detective Behr uses two ten-sided dice to get an Action Roll of 98, which gives an action number of (+2). Taking the trait modifier of (+1), situation modifier of (0), and challenge modifier of (-1) gives us:

 

  base action number   trait modifier   situation modifier   challenge modifier     final action number
( (+2) + (+1) + (0) - (-1) ) = (+4)

An action number of (+4) becomes (+3) and makes for an Outstanding result level —more than enough to break down the door. Said another way, Behr needed to make a Strength check vs. PoorPoor(-1)(4) Material and got an OutstandingOutstanding(+3)(20) result.

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Contests

In a contest, the character taking the action is the offensive character; the character trying to block or oppose him is the defensive character. As with checks, the player for each character generates an action number, then adds a trait modifier, plus any applicable situation modifiers, as determined by the GMGame Master. But then the number for the defensive character, the defense result, is subtracted from the number for the offensive character, the offense result, to get the final action number.

For example, say before Detective Max Behr even gets to his wooden door, a guard blocks his way and a fight starts. Time slows down to turns, and using the method described earlier in Who Goes First, it’s determined that Max goes first. Max opts to throw a punch using his Gr(+2)(15)Great(+2)(15) Brawling trait, and he gets a (+1) situation modifier for his Unarmed Combat skill. His player makes a Action Roll and gets Max a (+3) action number. The GMGame Master, rolling for the guard, gets a (+2) action number, adds the trait modifier for the guard’s Gd(+1)(10)Good(+1)(10) Brawling, and no situation modifiers. This gives us:

 

  offensive action number   offensive trait modifier   offensive situation modifier     offense result
( (+3) + (+2) + (+1) ) = (+6)
 
  defensive action number   defensive trait modifier   defensive situation modifier     defense result
( (+2) + (+1) + (0) ) = (+3)
 
( (+6) offense result - (+3) defense result ) = (+3) action number

An action number of +3 makes for a OutstandingOutstanding(+3)(20) result level, which is more than enough to land a punch. In fact, with this particular action, the guard may be knocked out (more on this later in Combat Consequences). Said another way, Max succeeded in a contest of his Brawling vs. the guard’s Brawling, and got an OutstandingOutstanding(+3)(20) result.

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Details, Details

Determining Challenge Levels

In Table 16: Weight, 400 kg is an Outstanding(+3)(20) Weight and 300 kg is a Great(+2)(15) Weight, but what about something that weighs 350 kg? Anything falling between two levels is treated as belonging to the higher of the two levels. Since 350 kg is more than 300 kg but less than 400 kg, it is treated as an OutstandingOutstanding(+3)(20) Weight.

Default Challenge Level

If the GMGame Master opts to not declare the level of a particular challenge, it defaults to a Common(0)(6) challenge.

Automatic Success and Failure

For a check that has no situation modifiers, if the trait being used is four or more levels higher than the challenge level, success is automatic and no Action Roll is required. On the other hand, if the trait being used is four or more levels lower than the challenge level, the action is impossible for your character to accomplish.

For example, when Detective Behr, with his Gd(+1)(10)Good(+1)(10) Strength, tries to smash through a sliding door of Dr(-3)(1)Dreadful(-3)(1) Material (rice paper and wood strips), he just breaks through without an Action Roll. Of course, when Behr encounters a Ph(+5)(40)Phenomenal(+5)(40) Material (metal) door to a secured laboratory, he’ll need to get past using something other than brute Strength.

“Pre-Actions”

Some actions don’t actually accomplish anything beyond determining if your character can better preform another action, such as a blind-side attack. These “pre-actions” don’t take any game time, and all Action Rolls for them happen just before the actual actions they are being used to enhance.

Spending Story Points

When a character has a chance, however small, to succeed at an action, the player can opt to spend Story Points to ensure its success. To do so, the player announces before making an Action Roll that Story Points will be spent to improve the action number. Then whatever the result, enough Story Points will be spent as needed to raise the action number up to the minimum required for success. Each Story Point spent raises the action number by one point. If it turns out that the character does not have enough Story Points to raise the action number enough to succeed, one point is still spent. If it turns out that no Story Points were needed after all, then one Story Point is spent anyway, just for using this option.

For example, say Max Behr is up to his usual, breaking down doors, but this time, it is critical to the current chapter that he break down the door in front of him. The player for Max declares that Story Points will be spent on this Action Roll. The action number turns out to be (-3), and Max needs a (+1), so he loses 4 of his Story Points to raise the (-3) result to (+1). If Behr doesn’t have 4 Story Points to spend, he will have failed and lost 1 Story Point anyway. If the action number had been the (+1) that Max needed, or higher, he would still lose 1 Story Point just for opting to spend Story Points.

— Table of Contents —

Example Actions

 

 

Pre-Action: Blind-side Attack

The classic “back-stab” and sniper shot are examples of this attack: an attempt to sneak in from outside someone’s field of view. Success gives a (+2) bonus to the actual attack. Failure just means the attack is detected and proceeds normally.

Pre-Action: Multiple Attacks
  • Check
  • Trait modifier: Brawling or Agility
  • Challenge modifier: OuOutstanding(+3)(20) (for 2), PhPhenomenal(+5)(40) (for 3), or WoWondrous(+7)(100) (for 4)

When fighting in place, your character can attempt more than one attack per turn. The challenge varies with the number of attacks attempted, and the trait depends on the attack type. Success means multiple attacks can be made with a (-1) penalty; failure means only one can be made, at a (-4) penalty. Added attacks occur after all others have acted at least once.

Hand-to-Hand Combat

Table 28: Combat Consequences shows outcomes at different result levels.

Distance Combat
  • Contest
  • Offensive trait modifier: Agility
  • Defensive trait modifier: Agility

Table 28: Combat Consequences shows outcomes at different result levels.

Mental or Magical Combat
Climbing Things
Lifting Things
Bending or Breaking Things
Shadowing

This is the art of following someone without being noticed. Success means your character can observe her subject and remain unnoticed; failure means she gets detected.

Extracting Information

This can be anything from a friendly conversation where the defensive character may not realize he’s telling more than he should, to a villain using the threat of violence to get the defensive character to talk.

Negotiation

Anything from sweet-talking a bouncer to gain entry into a private club, to haggling down the prices of provisions and equipment at a bazaar, to convincing an NPCNon Player Character to take a risk for a character —all these count as Negotiation.

— Table of Contents —

Example Situation Modifiers

While blinded - or when a creature’s primary sense is blocked, it suffers a (-4) penalty on all actions requiring that sense, which tend to include moving around and fighting.

While stunned - A stunned character suffers a (-3) situation modifier on all her actions until she recovers.

While acting at less than full Endurance - Your character suffers a (-2) penalty to all his actions when his Endurance trait is reduced below its usual level. The penalty stays in effect until he heals and his Endurance trait returns to normal.

In the dark or an alien environment - Characters suffer a (-1) penalty when they have to work in an environment that is foreign to them. For humans, this includes the dark, underwater, and zero gravity, as well as at extreme temperatures (WkWeak(-2)(2) cold or PrPoor(-1)(4) heat). For characters with mental powers, it includes interacting with the mind of another species.

In the field without proper equipment - If your character tries to practice a skill that requires the use of some sort of lab, garage, or hospital ward, and she’s out in the field without any equipment or just improvised tools, she gets a (-1) situation modifier for anything she tries to do through that skill.

As part of a team action - If your character is helped by another character with a trait that is equal to —or just one level below— the trait that your character is using to meet his challenge, he gets a (+1) bonus. If he gets help from two such characters, he gets a (+2) bonus; for three or more, he gets a (+3) bonus. For example, say “R3D” with her GreatGreat(+2)(15) Intelligence is trying to defeat a software virus and is being helped by five of her friends, of which four have either GoodGood(+1)(10) or GreatGreat(+2)(15) Intelligence. That counts as three or more people with an Intelligence trait equal to or one level less than hers, so she has a (+3) bonus while working this problem. The GMGame Master may declare that there is a limit to how many people can help a character. To break down a narrow door in a tight hallway, Max may only be able to get the help of one other person.

Sweep attack - Sometimes a character is willing to sacrifice accuracy for the chance to affect as many opponents as possible. One example is a martial artist who tries to trip several ninjas with one swing kick; another is a mercenary with an automatic weapon who stops aiming and just cuts a path of destruction across everything in sight. In both cases, the offensive character makes one attack with a (-4) penalty, while every defensive character in range (of the kick, the automatic weapon, etc…) defends separately. A character making this type of attack can do nothing else on her turn.

Multiple attacks - If she succeeded in the pre-action to determine if she could do it, a character can stay in place and make multiple attacks with a (-1) situation modifier. If she failed, she can still make one attack with a (-4) situation modifier.

Surprise attack - If your character manages to get the jump on an opponent, his first attack gets a (+1) bonus.

Blind-side attack - If a character can make an attack from outside of her opponent’s field of view, she gets a (+2) bonus A second such attack is not usually possible, because by then the defensive character usually knows her location.

Target is beyond CmCommon(0)(6) small size - Targeting anything at less than CommonCommon(0)(6) small size is done at a (-1) penalty for every level of small size beyond Cm(0)(6)Common(0)(6). See the “small” end of Table 27: Size / Volume for different levels of small size.

Target is beyond CmCommon(0)(6) large size - Targeting anything bigger than Cm(0)(6)Common(0)(6) large size is done with a (+1) bonus for every level of large size beyond CommonCommon(0)(6). See the “large” end of Table 27: Size / Volume for different large size levels.

Target is moving beyond CmCommon(0)(6) speed - Hitting something that’s moving faster than CommonCommon(0)(6) speed (72 kph / 45 mph) is done at a (-1) penalty for every level of speed over Cm(0)(6)Common(0)(6). See Table 24: Speed for different levels of speed.

Target is beyond CmCommon(0)(6) range - Shooting a distance weapon at something beyond Cm(0)(6)Common(0)(6) range (120m) is done with a (-1) penalty for every level of distance beyond Common(0)(6). See Table 21: Distance / Range for different levels of distance.

Target is blocked or has cover - If anything from a wall to another character is at least partially between an offensive character and her target, the attack gets a (-2) penalty.

Firing in fog, in rain, in haze, or at night - or in any other condition that makes it difficult to aim a distance combat weapon, the offensive character shoots with a (-1) penalty.

Taking one turn to aim - If your character does nothing but spend an entire turn aiming at his target, on his next turn he will be able to attack with a (+1) situation modifier.

Subject is a contact - Your character’s contacts are easier to convince than most, so in negotiations where your character is trying to get her way, a (+3) bonus applies.

Subject will benefit - Convincing someone is easier if they think they have something to gain. Such social interactions benefit from a (+2) situation modifier.

Subject is friendly - If the GMGame Master determines that an NPCNon Player Character is friendly towards a character, that character gets a (+1) bonus in any social situation or negotiations with that NPCNon Player Character.

Subject is unfriendly or suspicious - If an NPCNon Player Character is suspicious or unfriendly towards a character, she suffers a (-1) penalty in their social interactions. Some heroes turn people against them just by being the only ones in town that are armed, armored, in odd clothes, or simply not following local customs.

Something important to subject put a risk - In a negotiation where your character suggests endangering something held dear by an NPCNon Player Character (“The swamp monster ate my motorcycle. Can I borrow your new car to chase it down?”) he gets a (-2) penalty.

Subject is put at risk - If your character suggests something in a negotiation that risks an NPC’sNon Player Character’s reputation, livelihood, or life (“Can you guide me up to the lair of the swamp monster?”) she suffers a (-3) penalty towards getting what she wants.

Subject knows the character’s Reputation - In stories where a character’s Reputation is everything, such as those set in Celtic Ireland or feudal Japan, every character’s Reputation trait modifier is applied to every social interaction. In other stories, the GMGame Master decides when your character’s heroic Reputation or a villain’s Evil Reputation can get a social situation or negotiation to go the way he wants (in the case of villains, people often do things for them because of their fearsome reputations, not admiration). If your character built his reputation on being completely honest, even enemies will be influenced by his promises; Of course, if he built his reputation on slaying the Dragon of the East Wind, the Dragon of the West Wind won’t even bother to talk to him.

Table 15: Example Situation Modifiers
Modifier General
(-4) While blinded
(-3) While stunned
(-2) While acting at less than full Endurance
(-1) In the dark or an alien environment
(-1) In the field without proper equipment
(+3) (+2) (+1) As part of a team action
Modifier Combat
(-4) Sweep attack
(-4) / (-1) Multiple attacks, fail / succeed attempt
(+1) Surprise attack
(+2) Blind-side attack
(-1) / level Target is beyond CmCommon(0)(6) small size
(+1) / level Target is beyond CmCommon(0)(6) large size
Modifier Distance Combat
(-1) / level Target is moving beyond CmCommon(0)(6) speed
(-1) / level Target is beyond CmCommon(0)(6) range
(-2) Target is blocked or has cover
(-1) Firing in fog, in rain, in haze, or at night
(+1) Taking one turn to aim
Modifier Social
(+3) Subject is a contact
(+2) Subject will benefit
(+1) Subject is friendly
(-1) Subject is unfriendly or suspicious
(-2) Something important to subject put at risk
(-3) Subject is put at risk
Reputation Subject knows the character’s Reputation

— Table of Contents —

Example Challenge Levels

Table 16: Weight
Level Weight
M0Magnitude 0 \ Dr(-3)(1)Dreadful(-3)(1) 20 kg 40 lbs
M0Magnitude 0 \ Wk(-2)(2)Weak(-2)(2) 40 kg 80 lbs
M0Magnitude 0 \ Pr(-1)(4)Poor(-1)(4) 80 kg 160 lbs
M0Magnitude 0 \ Cm(0)(6)Common(0)(6) 120 kg 240 lbs
M0Magnitude 0 \ Gd(+1)(10)Good(+1)(10) 200 kg 400 lbs
M0Magnitude 0 \ Gr(+2)(15)Great(+2)(15) 300 kg 600 lbs
M0Magnitude 0 \ Ou(+3)(20)Outstanding(+3)(20) 400 kg 800 lbs
M0Magnitude 0 \ Ex(+4)(30)Extraordinary(+4)(30) 600 kg 1,200 lbs
M0Magnitude 0 \ Ph(+5)(40)Phenomenal(+5)(40) 800 kg 1,600 lbs
M0Magnitude 0 \ Fa(+6)(60)Fantastic(+6)(60) 1,200 kg 2,400 lbs
M0Magnitude 0 \ Wo(+7)(100)Wondrous(+7)(100) 2,000 kg 4,000 lbs
M1Magnitude 1 \ WoWondrous(+7)(100) 20 tonnes 20 tons
M2Magnitude 2 \WoWondrous(+7)(100) 200 tonnes 200 tons
M3Magnitude 3 \WoWondrous(+7)(100) 2,000 tonnes 2,000 tons
M4Magnitude 4 \ WoWondrous(+7)(100) 20,000 tonnes 20,000 tons
M5Magnitude 5 \WoWondrous(+7)(100) 200,000 tonnes 200,000 tons
M6Magnitude 6 \WoWondrous(+7)(100) 2,000,000 tonnes 2,000,000 tons
Table 17: Material
Level Example 5Regardless of an object’s composition, its Material trait can vary with thickness, construction, and reinforcement.
M0Magnitude 0 \ Dr(-3)(1)Dreadful(-3)(1) Cardboard, cellulose, ice, soapstone
M0Magnitude 0 \ Wk(-2)(2)Weak(-2)(2) Alabaster, glass, woven cotton
M0Magnitude 0 \ Pr(-1)(4)Poor(-1)(4) Bone, calcium fluoride crystal, lead crystal, rubber, wood, woven silk
M0Magnitude 0 \ Cm(0)(6)Common(0)(6) Clay, copper, tin, woven nylon
M0Magnitude 0 \ Gd(+1)(10)Good(+1)(10) Brass, bronze, limestone, marble
M0Magnitude 0 \ Gr(+2)(15)Great(+2)(15) Aluminum, concrete, high-impact plastic
M0Magnitude 0 \ Ou(+3)(20)Outstanding(+3)(20) Iron, woven para-aramids (e.g.: kevlar)
M0Magnitude 0 \ Ex(+4)(30)Extraordinary(+4)(30) Steel, titanium
M0Magnitude 0 \ Ph(+5)(40)Phenomenal(+5)(40) High-carbon steel and steel alloys
M0Magnitude 0 \ Fa(+6)(60)Fantastic(+6)(60) Granite
M0Magnitude 0 \ Wo(+7)(100)Wondrous(+7)(100) Quartz
M1Magnitude 1 \ Ou(+3)(20)Outstanding(+3)(20) Topaz
M1Magnitude 1 \ PhPhenomenal(+5)(40) Ruby, sapphire
M1Magnitude 1 \ WoWondrous(+7)(100) Tungsten carbide
M2Magnitude 2 \GrGreat(+2)(15) Diamond
5 Regardless of an object’s composition, its Material trait can vary with thickness, construction, and reinforcement.
Table 18: Acidity / Basicity
Level Example
M0Magnitude 0 \ Ph(+5)(40)Phenomenal(+5)(40) Caustic soda
M0Magnitude 0 \ Ex(+4)(30)Extraordinary(+4)(30) Lye
M0Magnitude 0 \ Ou(+3)(20)Outstanding(+3)(20) Bleach
M0Magnitude 0 \ Gr(+2)(15)Great(+2)(15) Ammonia
M0Magnitude 0 \ Wk(-2)(2)Weak(-2)(2) Sea water
M0Magnitude 0 \ Dr(-3)(1)Dreadful(-3)(1) Pure water
M0Magnitude 0 \ Pr(-1)(4)Poor(-1)(4) Acid rain
M0Magnitude 0 \ Gr(+2)(15)Great(+2)(15) Lemon juice, vinegar
M0Magnitude 0 \ Ex(+4)(30)Extraordinary(+4)(30) Battery acid
M0Magnitude 0 \ Fa(+6)(60)Fantastic(+6)(60) Hydrochloric acid
Table 19: Temperature
Level Temperature
M0Magnitude 0 \ Ex(+4)(30)Extraordinary(+4)(30) Absolute zero
M0Magnitude 0 \ Ou(+3)(20)Outstanding(+3)(20) -200°C -328°F 73 K
M0Magnitude 0 \ Gr(+2)(15)Great(+2)(15) -150°C -238°F 123 K
M0Magnitude 0 \ Gd(+1)(10)Good(+1)(10) -100°C -148°F 173 K
M0Magnitude 0 \ Cm(0)(6)Common(0)(6) -60°C -76°F 213 K
M0Magnitude 0 \ Pr(-1)(4)Poor(-1)(4) -40°C -40°F 233 K
M0Magnitude 0 \ Wk(-2)(2)Weak(-2)(2) -20°C -4°F 253 K
M0Magnitude 0 \ Dr(-3)(1)Dreadful(-3)(1) Near-freezing
M0Magnitude 0 \ Wk(-2)(2)Weak(-2)(2) 20°C 68°F 293 K
M0Magnitude 0 \ Pr(-1)(4)Poor(-1)(4) 40°C 104°F 313 K
M0Magnitude 0 \ Cm(0)(6)Common(0)(6) 50°C 140°F 333 K
M0Magnitude 0 \ Gd(+1)(10)Good(+1)(10) 100°C 212°F 373 K
M0Magnitude 0 \ Gr(+2)(15)Great(+2)(15) 150°C 302°F 423 K
M0Magnitude 0 \ Ou(+3)(20)Outstanding(+3)(20) 200°C 392°F 473 K
M0Magnitude 0 \ Ex(+4)(30)Extraordinary(+4)(30) 300°C 572°F 573 K
M0Magnitude 0 \ Ph(+5)(40)Phenomenal(+5)(40) 400°C 932°F 773 K
M0Magnitude 0 \ Fa(+6)(60)Fantastic(+6)(60) 600°C 1382°F 1023 K
M0Magnitude 0 \ Wo(+7)(100)Wondrous(+7)(100) 1,000°C 1832°F 1273 K
M1Magnitude 1 \ FaFantastic(+6)(60) Surface of the sun
Table 20: Visibility
Level Example
M0Magnitude 0 \ Dr(-3)(1)Dreadful(-3)(1) Starlight on a moonless night
M0Magnitude 0 \ Wk(-2)(2)Weak(-2)(2) Flashlight, moonlight
M0Magnitude 0 \ Pr(-1)(4)Poor(-1)(4) Dawn, dusk, torchlight
M0Magnitude 0 \ Cm(0)(6)Common(0)(6) Daylight on a partly-cloudy day, typical vehicle headlight
M0Magnitude 0 \ Gd(+1)(10)Good(+1)(10) Daylight on a cloudless day
Table 21: Distance / Range
Level Distance / Range
M0Magnitude 0 \ Dr(-3)(1)Dreadful(-3)(1) 20 m 60 ft
M0Magnitude 0 \ Wk(-2)(2)Weak(-2)(2) 40 m 120 ft
M0Magnitude 0 \ Pr(-1)(4)Poor(-1)(4) 80 m 240 ft
M0Magnitude 0 \ Cm(0)(6)Common(0)(6) 120 m 360 ft
M0Magnitude 0 \ Gd(+1)(10)Good(+1)(10) 200 m 600 ft
M0Magnitude 0 \ Gr(+2)(15)Great(+2)(15) 300 m 900 ft
M0Magnitude 0 \ Ou(+3)(20)Outstanding(+3)(20) 400 m 1,200 ft
M0Magnitude 0 \ Ex(+4)(30)Extraordinary(+4)(30) 600 m 1,800 ft
M0Magnitude 0 \ Ph(+5)(40)Phenomenal(+5)(40) 800 m 2,400 ft
M0Magnitude 0 \ Fa(+6)(60)Fantastic(+6)(60) 1,200 m 3,600 ft
M0Magnitude 0 \ Wo(+7)(100)Wondrous(+7)(100) 2,000 m 4,000 ft
M1Magnitude 1 \ PhPhenomenal(+5)(40) Height of Mount Everest
M1Magnitude 1 \ FaFantastic(+6)(60) Depth of Challenger Deep
M2Magnitude 2 \FaFantastic(+6)(60) Height of Kármán line (edge of space)
M3Magnitude 3 \FaFantastic(+6)(60) Distance to edge of Earth’s geocorona
M4Magnitude 4 \ OuOutstanding(+3)(20) Los Angeles to New York
M4Magnitude 4 \ ExExtraordinary(+4)(30) New York to London, London to New Delhi
M4Magnitude 4 \ PhPhenomenal(+5)(40) Sydney to Tokyo, Tokyo to Los Angeles
M4Magnitude 4 \ FaFantastic(+6)(60) New Delhi to Sydney
M5Magnitude 5 \OuOutstanding(+3)(20) Circumference of the Earth
M6Magnitude 6 \GrGreat(+2)(15) One light-second
M6Magnitude 6 \OuOutstanding(+3)(20) Distance from Earth to the Moon
M6Magnitude 6 \WoWondrous(+7)(100) Distance light travels in one turn
Table 22: Information
Level Example
M0Magnitude 0 \ Dr(-3)(1)Dreadful(-3)(1) 1 MBone megabyte (one megabyte), one book
M0Magnitude 0 \ Wk(-2)(2)Weak(-2)(2) One high resolution photograph, Tolstoy’s War and Peace
M0Magnitude 0 \ Cm(0)(6)Common(0)(6) Complete works of William Shakespeare, The Oxford English Dictionary
M0Magnitude 0 \ Gd(+1)(10)Good(+1)(10) 10 MBone megabyte, one minute of detailed video
M0Magnitude 0 \ Ex(+4)(30)Extraordinary(+4)(30) Encyclopedia set
M0Magnitude 0 \ Fa(+6)(60)Fantastic(+6)(60) Encyclopædia Britanica
M0Magnitude 0 \ Wo(+7)(100)Wondrous(+7)(100) 100 MBone megabyte
M1Magnitude 1 \ WoWondrous(+7)(100) 1,000 MBone megabyte, 1 GBone gigabyte (one gigabyte)
M2Magnitude 2 \FaFantastic(+6)(60) One hour of detailed video
M2Magnitude 2 \WoWondrous(+7)(100) 100 GBone gigabyte, the human genome
M3Magnitude 3 \WoWondrous(+7)(100) 1,000 GBone gigabyte, 1 TBone terabyte (one terabyte)
M4Magnitude 4 \ GrGreat(+2)(15) US Library of Congress book collection
M4Magnitude 4 \ WoWondrous(+7)(100) 100 TBone terabyte, capacity of the human brain
Table 23: Magnification
Level Example
M0Magnitude 0 \ Wk(-2)(2)Weak(-2)(2) x20 Cloth weave, hair
M0Magnitude 0 \ Pr(-1)(4)Poor(-1)(4) x40 Insect details
M0Magnitude 0 \ Cm(0)(6)Common(0)(6) x60 Microfilm
M0Magnitude 0 \ Ex(+4)(30)Extraordinary(+4)(30) x300 Cells
M0Magnitude 0 \ Wo(+7)(100)Wondrous(+7)(100) x1000 Metal fatigue
Table 24: Speed
Level Speed Example
M0Magnitude 0 \ Dr(-3)(1)Dreadful(-3)(1) 20 m/turn 60 ft/turn 12 kph 7.5 mph  
M0Magnitude 0 \ Wk(-2)(2)Weak(-2)(2) 40 m/turn 120 ft/turn 24 kph 15.0 mph Typical human
M0Magnitude 0 \ Pr(-1)(4)Poor(-1)(4) 80 m/turn 240 ft/turn 48 kph 30.0 mph  
M0Magnitude 0 \ Cm(0)(6)Common(0)(6) 120 m/turn 360 ft/turn 72 kph 45.0 mph Quarter Horse
M0Magnitude 0 \ Gd(+1)(10)Good(+1)(10) 200 m/turn 600 ft/turn 120 kph 75.0 mph Cheetah sprinting for one turn
M0Magnitude 0 \ Gr(+2)(15)Great(+2)(15) 300 m/turn 900 ft/turn 180 kph 122.5 mph  
M0Magnitude 0 \ Ou(+3)(20)Outstanding(+3)(20) 400 m/turn 1,200 ft/turn 240 kph 150.0 mph Peregrine Falcon in a dive
M0Magnitude 0 \ Ex(+4)(30)Extraordinary(+4)(30) 600 m/turn 1,800 ft/turn 360 kph 225.0 mph 2002 Ferrari Enzo sportscar
M0Magnitude 0 \ Ph(+5)(40)Phenomenal(+5)(40) 800 m/turn 2,400 ft/turn 480 kph 300.0 mph  
M0Magnitude 0 \ Fa(+6)(60)Fantastic(+6)(60) 1,200 m/turn 3,600 ft/turn 720 kph 450.0 mph  
M0Magnitude 0 \ Wo(+7)(100)Wondrous(+7)(100) 2,000 m/turn 6,000 ft/turn 1,200 kph 750.0 mph Mach 1
M1Magnitude 1 \ OuOutstanding(+3)(20)         Mach 2
M1Magnitude 1 \ ExExtraordinary(+4)(30)         Mach 3
M1Magnitude 1 \ WoWondrous(+7)(100)         Mach 10
M2Magnitude 2 \ExExtraordinary(+4)(30)         Earth escape velocity
M6Magnitude 6 \WoWondrous(+7)(100)         10% of the speed of light
M7Magnitude 7 \ WoWondrous(+7)(100)         Speed of light
Table 25: Slipperiness
Level Example
M0Magnitude 0 \ Wk(-2)(2)Weak(-2)(2) Stone
M0Magnitude 0 \ Cm(0)(6)Common(0)(6) Glass
M0Magnitude 0 \ Ou(+3)(20)Outstanding(+3)(20) Ice
M0Magnitude 0 \ Ex(+4)(30)Extraordinary(+4)(30) Oil
M0Magnitude 0 \ Ph(+5)(40)Phenomenal(+5)(40) Polytetrafluoroethylenes (e.g.: teflon)
Table 26: Fire
Level Example
M0Magnitude 0 \ Dr(-3)(1)Dreadful(-3)(1) One match
M0Magnitude 0 \ Wk(-2)(2)Weak(-2)(2) One candle
M0Magnitude 0 \ Cm(0)(6)Common(0)(6) One oil lamp
M0Magnitude 0 \ Gr(+2)(15)Great(+2)(15) Campfire, hearth
M0Magnitude 0 \ Wo(+7)(100)Wondrous(+7)(100) Forrest fire
M1Magnitude 1 \ GrGreat(+2)(15) Volcano
Table 27: Size / Volume
Level Size / Volume Example
WoWondrous(+7)(100) 2 cm3 8 in3  
FaFantastic(+6)(60) 3 cm3 14 in3  
PhPhenomenal(+5)(40) 5 cm3 21 in3  
ExExtraordinary(+4)(30) 7 cm3 28 in3  
OuOutstanding(+3)(20) 10 cm3 42 in3  
GrGreat(+2)(15) 15 cm3 56 in3  
GdGood(+1)(10) 20 cm3 7 ft3  
CmCommon(0)(6) 30 cm3 12 ft3  
PrPoor(-1)(4) 50 cm3 18 ft3  
WkWeak(-2)(2) 1 m3 35 ft3  
M0Magnitude 0 \ Dr(-3)(1)Dreadful(-3)(1) 2 m3 70 ft3 Typical human
M0Magnitude 0 \ Wk(-2)(2)Weak(-2)(2) 4 m3 140 ft3  
M0Magnitude 0 \ Pr(-1)(4)Poor(-1)(4) 8 m3 280 ft3 Elephant
M0Magnitude 0 \ Cm(0)(6)Common(0)(6) 12 m3 420 ft3  
M0Magnitude 0 \ Gd(+1)(10)Good(+1)(10) 20 m3 700 ft3  
M0Magnitude 0 \ Gr(+2)(15)Great(+2)(15) 30 m3 1,050 ft3 20’ shipping container
M0Magnitude 0 \ Ou(+3)(20)Outstanding(+3)(20) 40 m3 1,400 ft3  
M0Magnitude 0 \ Ex(+4)(30)Extraordinary(+4)(30) 60 m3 2,100 ft3 40’ shipping container
M0Magnitude 0 \ Ph(+5)(40)Phenomenal(+5)(40) 80 m3 2,800 ft3 Semi-trailer
M0Magnitude 0 \ Fa(+6)(60)Fantastic(+6)(60) 120 m3 4,200 ft3  
M0Magnitude 0 \ Wo(+7)(100)Wondrous(+7)(100) 200 m3 7,000 ft3  
M1Magnitude 1 \ GrGreat(+2)(15) Cargo space of US Space Shuttle
M1Magnitude 1 \ FaFantastic(+6)(60) Cargo space of air transport Beluga
M4Magnitude 4 \ ExExtraordinary(+4)(30) Cargo space of oil tanker Jahre Viking

— Table of Contents —

How Fast, How Long, How Far

As seen in Table 24: Speed, a typical human can cover 40 meters in one turn if all she does is run. If she also takes an action that turn, she moves at half speed. While swimming or climbing, she moves at one-quarter speed. When free-falling in Earth’s gravity, she falls at DreadfulDreadful(-3)(1) speed on her first turn of falling, at WeakWeak(-2)(2) speed on the next turn, then falls at another higher level of speed every turn until she reaches GreatGreat(+2)(15) speed —or hits the ground. Anything else that moves is assumed to move at these speeds unless it has a Speed trait or some sort of Transport power. Unless something has an Acceleration trait (see Gear), it starts moving at DreadfulDreadful(-3)(1) speed on its first turn and increases its speed by one level every turn until it reaches top speed.

Of course, humans can’t move at top speed forever. After a number of turns of running, climbing, swimming, etc… equal to the value of his Endurance trait, a character must make an Endurance check vs. the CommonCommon(0)(6) challenge of continuing to move at top speed. If he fails, he is too tired to go on. If he succeeds, he can continue for another set of turns equal to his Endurance trait value, after which he must make a check vs. a GoodGood(+1)(10) challenge. The level of the challenge keeps rising each such set of turns until the character is exhausted. An exhausted character must wait ten turns and succeed at the same Endurance check he just failed to go on. If he fails, he must wait another ten turns and try again, this time with the challenge at one level less; The challenge keeps dropping one level every ten turns. This rule can also apply to other strenuous physical activities.

An alternative to running after the villains is to shoot (arrows, laser beams, balls of mystic fire) at them. Weapons and powers that work at a distance are described by a Range trait. Different levels of Range are listed in Table 21: Distance / Range.

At a range of M6Magnitude 6 \ WoWondrous(+7)(100), or 6 light-seconds, distance combat becomes impractical. At that range, even with a weapon that moved at the speed of light, any attack you launch won’t reach your opponent until the next turn; but you won’t know where your opponent really is, because what you see of her is the light from where she was positioned on the previous turn. For this game, the maximum range for distance combat is M5Magnitude 5 \ Wondrous, or 200,000,000 m (less than one light-second).

— Table of Contents —

Consequences

Combat Consequences

Some actions have special consequences for different result levels (occurring in addition anything else the GMGame Master decides), described in a Table of Consequences. Combat actions have Table 28: Combat Consequences, which uses the following terms:

blunt weapons - In hand-to-hand combat, blunt weapons include fists, feet, baseball bats, and maces. In distance combat they include boomerangs, rocks, and rubber bullets.

sharp weapons - In hand-to-hand combat, knives, fangs, swords, and pointy sticks count as sharp weapons. In distance combat, sharp weapons include standard bullets and arrows.

holds - refers to moves seen in fighting styles like judo or wrestling, where the idea is to get a hold of an opponent.

open (+1), open (+2) - The offensive character didn’t just miss; he over-extended, dropped his guard, lost his balance, or did something that created an opening in his defenses. If the defensive character decides to attack back on her next turn, she will have either a (+1) or (+2) bonus for that attack, depending on how much of an opening she got.

miss - The offensive character simply fails to hit the defensive character, and nothing more.

hit - The offensive character hits the defensive character and does damage as described in Getting Hit.

knockback? - The defensive character was hit so hard that he may have been knocked out. The character makes an Endurance check vs. a CommonCommon(0)(6) challenge and sees the knockback column for the consequences. If the offensive character doesn’t actually do any damage and doesn’t have the Pressure Points skill, treat this as a simple hit.

knock out? - The defensive character was either hit in a vulnerable spot or hit so hard that she may go unconscious. She must make an Endurance check vs. a CommonCommon(0)(6) challenge and see the knock out column for the consequences. If no damage was done and the offensive character doesn’t have the Pressure Points skill, this is treated as just a hit.

critical hit? - The defensive character was hit in a vulnerable spot and may start dying. He must make an Endurance check vs. a CmCommon(0)(6) challenge and see the critical hit column to learn the consequences. If the offensive character did no damage and didn’t have the Pressure Points skill, this is treated as a hit.

reversed - When the offensive character tried to get a better hold, she failed, the defensive character reversed it, and now she is the one being held. She starts the next turn in a partial (-1) hold.

slip free - The defensive character slipped out of the offensive character’s hold.

partial (-1), partial (-2) - The offensive character was able to get the defensive character into a hold, and has one or more limbs, tentacles, etc… immobilized. The defensive character can still attack back, but with a (-1) or (-2) penalty, depending on how well he is being held.

full - The offensive character has immobilized the defensive character; the defensive character can no longer attack back. Starting the next turn, the offensive character can choose to inflict damage equal to the value of her Strength trait every turn, until the defensive character loses all his Health Points.

Strength - The defensive character was hit so hard that she gets knocked back; either one meter or a number of meters equal to the Strength modifier of the offensive character, whichever is greater. If she collides with anything (say, a wall) before traveling the full distance, she takes damage equal to its Material trait. On the other hand, if the character has a higher Armor or Endurance trait than what she hits, it takes damage from her instead.

1 meter - The defensive character is hit so hard that he is knocked back one meter.

1 step - The defensive character is hit hard enough to knock her back one step. If she encounters anything in that one step, (a floor full of marbles, someone bent over tying his shoes, the edge of a cliff), she may trip or fall or get hurt even more.

no - The defensive character got lucky. He didn’t get held, knocked back, or knocked out, and isn’t going to start dying any time soon.

out SRSimple Rollx10 turns - The defensive character will be unconscious for a number of turns equal to a Simple Roll times ten.

stunned SRSimple Roll turns - The defensive character will be stunned for for a number of turns equal to a Simple Roll. While stunned, all her actions will suffer a (-3) situation modifier.

stunned 1 turn - The defensive character will spend the next turn stunned, with all his actions getting a (-3) penalty.

dying - The defensive character suffered a fatal wound. She loses all her Health Points and starts dying. See Going, going, gone for all the details.

Table 28: Combat Consequences
Result Level Hand-to-Hand Combat Actions (Brawling) Distance Combat Actions (Agility) Combat Effects Actions (Endurance)
blunt weapons sharp weapons holds blunt weapons sharp weapons knockback knock out critical hit
DrDreadful(-3)(1) open (+2) open (+2) reversed miss miss Strength out SRSimple Rollx10 turns dying
WkWeak(-2)(2) open (+1) open (+1) slip free miss miss 1 meter stunned SRSimple Roll turns knock out?
PrPoor(-1)(4) miss miss slip free miss miss 1 step stunned 1 turn knock out?
CmCommon(0)(6) miss miss no miss miss no no no
GdGood(+1)(10) hit hit partial (-1) hit hit no no no
GrGreat(+2)(15) knockback? knock out? partial (-2) knock out? knock out? no no no
OuOutstanding(+3)(20) knock out? critical hit? full knock out? critical hit? no no no
Information-Gathering Consequences

Information-gathering, through research, detective-work, socializing, or even interrogation, comes with its own special set of consequences, described below in Table 29. The quality and accuracy of the information depends, of course, on the source. A villain’s lieutenant may be convinced into telling everything she knows about her master’s plans, but she may only know the parts that affect her. Likewise, the chemical analysis of a muddy footprint may reveal a great deal about a thief that snuck into a building through the sewers, but may tell little about his partner who came in by glider.

Table 29: Information-Gathering Consequences
Result Level Result
DrDreadful(-3)(1) False information.
WkWeak(-2)(2) No useful information.
PrPoor(-1)(4) No useful information.
CmCommon(0)(6) A minor clue, a time, a place, or a person connected to the information being sought.
GdGood(+1)(10) Two minor clues.
GrGreat(+2)(15) A critical piece of information that could get the PCsPlayer Characters closer to achieving their goal for their current mission, or give them an advantage over the current villains in one situation.
OuOutstanding(+3)(20) All the information the subject can provide about the information being sought.
More Consequences

Later on in Gear is Table 32: Building Consequences, which describes what happens when characters try to build things. Depending on the type of story, the GMGame Master may make use of other Tables of Consequences. It may be important to your story to have a standard set of consequences for what happens when a wizard summons a genie, when a computer network is hacked, when a price is being haggled, or when a character calls on a contact once too often.

— Table of Contents —

Getting Hurt

Getting Hit

When a character successfully attacks using some body part, such as a fist, foot, or tail, he inflicts damage on his opponent equal to the value of his Strength trait. This damage is subtracted from the opponent’s Health Points.

If a character is holding a weapon (e.g.: knife, baseball bat, frying pan) or using a weapon attached to her body (e.g.: claws, antlers, hooves, fangs, spines), the damage inflicted depends on whether her Strength trait is higher or lower than the Material trait of the weapon. If her Strength trait is higher, the damage equals the Material trait value of her weapon. If her Strength trait is lower, the damage equals the value of the next highest Strength level. If both are the same, the damage equals the value of her Strength trait.

If the character is using a weapon that does damage from a distance (e.g.: pistol, throwing star, arrow, boomerang), use the weapon’s Damage trait value.

For example, Ami “R3D” Liu, with her Common(0)(6) Strength, causes 6 points of damage with a punch or a kick. If she cracks a crystal vase of Pr(-1)(4)Poor(-1)(4) Material over someone’s head, she does 4 points of damage, but if she uses a tire iron of Ou(+3)(20)Outstanding(+3)(20) Material, it’s as if she had the next highest level Strength, Gd(+1)(10)Good(+1)(10), and she inflicts 10 points of damage. If she borrows Max Behr’s gun (not really her style), with a Gd(+1)(10)Good(+1)(10) Damage trait, she also does 10 points of damage.

Poison and Radiation

A character exposed to poison must make an Endurance check vs. the challenge level of the poison. A result level of CommonCommon(0)(6) or less means the character loses one level of Endurance (and his Health Points get re-adjusted accordingly). The character must make this check every turn until he gets a GoodGood(+1)(10) or better result, or he has no more levels of Endurance. On the turn after he loses his last level on Endurance, the character loses his remaining Health Points and starts dying (see Going, going, gone). Exposure to radiation works in the same way.

Extreme Temperatures and Pollution

In cold weather of WeakWeak(-2)(2) level or greater, or hot weather of PoorPoor(-1)(4) level or greater, characters who are not protected from extreme temperature lose a number of Health Points a day equal to the value of the temperature’s challenge level. In a polluted environment, characters who are not protected from the air or water or food lose a number of Health Points per day equal to the value of the pollution’s challenge level.

Vacuum, Extreme Pressure, and No Air

In the hard vacuum of outer space or the extreme pressure of the Marianas trench, a character must make an Endurance check vs. a challenge level of OutstandingOutstanding(+3)(20), every turn, with a (-1) penalty added for every turn of exposure after the first. A result level of PoorPoor(-1)(4) or less means the character loses all her Health Points and starts dying (see Going, going, gone). When a character just has to hold her breath, say under shallow water, the challenge level is CommonCommon(0)(6).

Fire, Ice, Electricity, Acid, and Other Things That Hurt

A character hit by a flame-thrower, a science fiction “cold ray”, a bolt of lightning, or a monster’s acidic spit takes damage equal to the value of the level of the attack. For other, unspecified ways to hurt a character, a good rule of thumb is to use either the Material trait of the object involved or the challenge level of the whatever substance or energy is at work.

— Table of Contents —

Getting Better (or Not)

If a character spends an entire hour in complete rest —no traveling, no research, no action— at the end of the hour he will recover a number of Health Points equal to the value of his current Endurance trait. If a character spends an entire week in complete rest, he will recover one lost level of any trait. With the attention of someone using the First Aid skill, he can recover an extra number of Health Points (equal to his Endurance trait) per day. With the attention of someone using the Medicine skill, that character can also recover one lost level per day.

Going, going, gone

When a character loses all her Health Points, she starts dying. If within the next ten turns, another character doesn’t stop and spend a turn stabilizing her condition, she will die and exit the story. A character can be stabilized by anyone, but this only stops the character from dying for one hour. After that hour, the character starts dying again. If a character with the First Aid or Medicine skill attends to a dying character, she can be brought back up to one Health Point.

In some stories that feature advanced science or magic, it might be possible to bring someone back from the dead. If the GMGame Master allows this, a character that returns from the dead always loses all his Unused Character Points and always comes back with his Endurance trait permanently reduced by one level. He will need to spend Character Points to raise his Endurance level back to what it once was.

— Table of Contents —

Improving Characters

At the end of every chapter (or if you ended with a cliffhanger, at the end of the very next chapter) the GMGame Master pauses the story to take stock of all the heroes’ successes and failures. Each important event or encounter in a chapter —each villain, crime, rescue, riddle, trap, or goal— is an opportunity to earn or lose Character Points and levels of Reputation.

To determine what each character earned, the GMGame Master first looks up the impact of the heroes’ actions for the chapter on Table 30: Earning Character Points; Did they work to save a little girl, a city, or an entire ecosystem? Then the GMGame Master adds and subtracts Character Points for the individual deeds that occurred. Finally, the GMGame Master divides all the points, rounding down, among the entire team of PCsPlayer Characters. This means the successes and failures of one character can affect everyone’s characters.

After handing out the Character Points earned by the entire team, the GMGame Master may hand out a few more to an individual PCPlayer Character if a player did something exceptional. Also, the GMGame Master determines if any individual character did something important enough to increase or decrease his Reputation.

— Table of Contents —

Earning Character Points

Depending on the story, the GMGame Master may award Character Points for downing enemy aircraft, mapping new routes, or curing diseases. The most common ways to earn (and lose) Character Points appear in Table 30, using terms explained below:

Impact - If the villain’s plan will bring ruin to one person or family, foiling the plot earns the team 20 Character Points; if the plan put an entire world in peril, the team earns 50 points. As the stakes get higher, the points increase. These Character Points are only given out once per chapter.

Opposition - If the team consists of soldiers with automatic weapons, and the biggest trouble they run into are meter-long rats, they just earn 10 points. On the other hand, if they face a giant robot tank, the team earns a number of Character Points equal the value of the tank’s highest trait. These points are given out for every major opponent defeated. Note that an opponent doesn’t have to be killed to be defeated.

Mission goal - Sometimes it takes several chapters to try to complete a single goal, such as “rescue the kidnapped baby”, “stop the invasion”, or “expose the imposter”, but at the end of the chapter where the team either succeeds or fails in the goal of their current mission, they gain or lose 100 points.

Resolved a critical plot point - Sometimes a goal can’t be achieved unless certain critical steps are completed, such as when “decrypt the map to the amulet parts”, “gather the three parts”, and “learn to assemble the amulet”, are necessary steps in the goal of “defeat the archmage with the amulet”. For each such step, 50 points can be earned or lost.

Rescued innocents - Rescuing one or more people from the forces of evil or just natural catastrophes earns the team 30 points. Note that rescuing team members doesn’t count.

Solved a riddle, mystery,or trap - In some stories, finding out vital clues, unraveling mysteries, and outwitting deadly traps happen much more often than hand-to-hand combat. Triumphing over these types of challenges earns the team 20 points for each such challenge.

Crime - Fighting crime is a heroic basic, and the GMGame Master will let you know what types of laws (Hamurabi’s Code, Code Napoleon, Rights of Man, Universal Declaration of Human Rights) exist in your story and what count as minor and major crimes. Preventing a crime altogether earns twice the points of stopping a crime, while committing a crime, even for a good reason (say, in the case of a certain detective who keeps breaking down other people’s doors), costs twice as many points as preventing that crime. Failing to stop or prevent a crime causes heroes to lose as many Character Points as they would have earned had they succeeded.

Unheroic or dishonorable act - Depending on the story, disobeying one’s feudal lord, refusing a duel, breaking a vow, or killing innocents (or even anyone) could all be considered unheroic. The GMGame Master will say what counts in your story

Taking one for the team - This could be just about anything where one character puts herself at a great inconvenience or danger to help another on her team. An example could be holding off a horde of space pirates at an airlock while the rest of the team tries to prepare an escape pod for launch.

Teamwork - When two or more characters find clever ways to use their individual skills or powers together to do something better than they could separately, they each get 15 points.

Roleplaying - You might be able to guess that the object your GMGame Master just described is an alien energy pistol and that by pulling the trigger, your character might at least scare off the family of jaguars coming through the wreckage of what you know to be a flying saucer … but your character doesn’t. He’s a Mayan astronomer at the height of Tikal’s glory who has no idea what he’s holding in his hands while he explores a “strange temple”. So you have him toss aside the pistol and pick up a spear —and earn him 10 points in the process.

Creative solution - If the GMGame Master figured there were only two ways to deactivate a trap, but your character found a clever third way, she earns 5 Character Points.

Table 30: Earning Character Points
Team Points, Per Chapter Example
+ 100 Impact: Interplanetary / Interdimensional
+ 50 Impact: Planetary
+ 40 Impact: Regional
+ 30 Impact: Local
+ 20 Impact: Personal
Team Points, Per Event Example
+ Highest Trait Defeated equal or superior opposition
+ 10 Defeated inferior opposition
+/- 100 Achieved mission goal
+/- 50 Resolved a critical plot point
+ 30 Rescued innocents
+ 20 Solved a riddle, mystery, or trap
+/- 20 / 40 Prevented a minor / major crime
+/- 10 / 20 Stopped a minor / major crime in progress
- 40 / 80 Committed a minor / major crime
- 200 Unheroic or dishonorable act
Solo Points, Per Chapter Example
+ 20 Taking one for the team
+ 15 Teamwork
+ 10 Roleplaying
+ 5 Creative solution

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Earning Reputation

Some of the deeds described above are important enough to increase or decrease a character’s Reputation. Depending on the story, there may be others, such as defeating an ancestral clan enemy, forging a mighty magic weapon, breaking a taboo, banishment from a noble house, or being whispered about in society drawing rooms as the subject of a scandal. The most common ways to earn (and lose) Reputation levels are listed in Table 31: Earning Reputation Levels.

Table 31: Earning Reputation Levels
Reputation Levels, Per Event Example
+1 Defeated a superior opponent
+1 Rescued innocents
-1 Lost to an inferior opponent
-1 Committed a major crime
-4 Unheroic / dishonorable act

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When Improvements Take Effect

Newly acquired Character Points can usually be spent right away. It is assumed that the enhanced traits or new skills your character demonstrates are things that he was working on all along. However, the GMGame Master may rule that some things, such as entirely new powers, will not take effect until you play a scene in the next chapter where the new power emerges. Players can always buy their characters more Story Points right away. Likewise, Reputation changes take effect immediately.

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Negative Character Points

So what if the team did so poorly that at the end of a chapter that each character ends up with a negative number of Character Points? Those points are first subtracted from each character’s Unused Character Points until there are no more left, then from her Story Points until there are none of those left either, then the subtracting stops. The character will not “owe” points from chapter to chapter.

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Negative Reputation Levels

If a character’s Reputation doesn’t just drop to DreadfulDreadful(-3)(1), but he effectively gets negative levels, very bad things happen. If he earns -1 to -4 levels after dropping to a Dr(-3)(1)Dreadful(-3)(1) Reputation, his Reputation stays at DreadfulDreadful(-3)(1) and he will not “owe” levels from chapter to chapter, but he automatically fails all social actions in the next chapter with anyone but a contact. If he earns -5 to -8 levels of Reputation beyond DreadfulDreadful(-3)(1), the GMGame Master has three options:

  • Take the character out of the game. The player can make a new one using the same Character Points given for a beginning character.
  • Turn the character into an NPCNon Player Character villain under the GMGame Master’s control and have the player make a new one, as above.
  • Change the character’s Reputation trait into the Evil Reputation trait, with a DreadfulDreadful(-3)(1) level for -5, a WeakWeak(-2)(2) level for -6, a PoorPoor(-1)(4) level for -7, and a CommonCommon(0)(6) level for -8. He becomes a “fallen hero” working towards redemption. Everyone treats him like a villain and he loses all his contacts. Every two levels of Reputation he earns through heroic deeds drops his Evil Reputation by one. When he has a Dr(-3)(1)Dreadful(-3)(1) Evil Reputation, if he can do something that earns him four levels of Reputation in one chapter and the GMGame Master determines it “makes amends”,his Evil Reputation trait becomes the normal Reputation trait with a DreadfulDreadful(-3)(1) level. He loses all evil contacts and can try to regain his old ones, but the GMGame Master may rule that some people may never completely trust him again.

Earning more than -8 levels of Reputation beyond DreadfulDreadful(-3)(1) is like earning -8 levels, except that being a “fallen hero” is no longer an option.

Turning evil is one of the few ways to “lose” the game.

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Gear

Gear Traits

Depending on the type, different gear is described by different sets of traits (or even trait boosters and skill boosters; see It’s You, Only Better). Complex gear is divided into subsystems: collections of traits that all apply to one broad function, such as the structural, power / propulsion, and communication subsystems of a vehicle. Simple gear may be described by one relevant trait —say the Signal Range of a mobile phone— plus its Price; all its other traits are assumed to be CommonCommon(0)(6). The Price is calculated from all other traits; this is explained later in Pricing Gear. Besides traits that have already been explained, such as Material, Speed, and Range, other traits to describe gear include:

Damage - the amount of damage inflicted by one shot in distance combat, equal to the value of the level of this trait. A gun with a Gd(+1)(10)Good(+1)(10) Damage trait does 10 points of damage with each bullet. If a weapon can take more than one type of shot, such as rubber, standard, and armor-piercing bullets, then the Damage trait for each type of clip / magazine should be listed separately.

Power Source - The value of the level of this trait equals the number of days a piece of gear can keep running and generating power without stopping to refuel, recharge, re-anything. It is also the number of devices with the Power Reserve trait that it can recharge per day, assuming compatible technologies (they are considered negligible power drains). This can represent all manner of science fiction power plants. A spaceship with a PhPhenomenal(+5)(40) Power Plant can stay in operation for 50 days before needing to refuel.

Power Reserve - The value of the level of this trait equals the number of hours a piece of gear can keep running without refueling, recharging, changing batteries, or plugging into a compatible Power Source. A motorcycle with a Common(0)(6) Power Reserve can go for 6 hours on a tank of fuel.

Acceleration - how fast something can change speed. Instead of increasing speed by one level every turn, a vehicle with this trait can increase it speed every turn by the number of levels it has of Acceleration.

Capacity - the amount of weight that something can haul as cargo and passengers, as opposed to the amount of weight that something can pick up as if it where a character. Use the weights listed in Table 16: Weight and multiply them by ten to determine how much a piece of gear can haul. A vehicle with Gr(+2)(15)Great(+2)(15) Capacity can haul (10 x 300 kg =) 3,000 kg of cargo and passengers.

Data Storage - How much data a device can hold. Use the amounts listed in Table 22: Information and multiply by 1,000 to determine how much information a piece of gear with this trait can hold.

Signal Range - The range at which a piece of gear can send or receive a communications signal on its own. Multiply the distances in Table 21: Distance / Range by 100 to determine a device’s Signal Range. Note that gear such as a mobile phone has a tiny Signal Range; it only needs to reach a network.

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It’s Broke

Do damage to a piece of gear equal to its Material trait value, and it breaks, and then can’t be used again until it gets repaired. If a piece of gear has the Brawling, Agility, Strength, and Endurance traits, it also has Health Points, which must be used instead of the Material trait when determining how much damage it can take. This situation shows up most often with robots and golems. Which brings us to…

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It’s Alive?

If a piece of gear has an Intelligence trait, it can think, or at least carry out calculations, but does nothing without instructions from a character. A typical single-purpose computer like the one found in a “smart missile” has Intelligence.

If it has a Perception trait, a piece of gear can experience its surroundings in some way, and its senses should be defined. Without Perception, it is totally dependent on the information fed into it by a character, such as a driver steering a vehicle or a programmer writing a program for a computer. A piece of gear would never have Perception without Intelligence; it would just have sensors instead. Typical robots, and a few magic swords, have both Intelligence and Perception.

A piece of gear would never have a Willpower trait without both Intelligence and Perception. If it does have Willpower, it is both self-aware and alive, and should be treated as an NPCNon Player Character. Destroying it would be like killing a character. Artificial lifeforms have Willpower, Intelligence, and Perception.

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It’s You, Only Better

Some gear can boost one or more of a character’s own traits. The only traits for which this can be done are Brawling, Agility, Strength, Endurance, Willpower, Intelligence, Perception, and Speed. If a piece of gear has one of those six traits, and it isn’t meant to be used instead of a character’s own trait, but as a trait booster, the word “Boost” is added to the name. For example, a machine that moves boxes of cargo would have its Strength trait written as:

Strength: Outstanding(+3)(20)

But a powered exoskeleton that magnifies the Strength of its user would have its Strength trait written as:

Strength Boost: Outstanding(+3)(20)

A piece of gear with a trait booster enhances its user’s own trait by a number of levels equal to its trait modifier. The upper limit for the boost is the level of the trait booster. For example, a character with PoorPoor(-1)(4) Strength using a powered exoskeleton with a Ou(+3)(20)Outstanding(+3)(20) Strength Boost would have her Strength boosted three levels while she used it, to GreatGreat(+2)(15). If she had GreatGreat(+2)(15) Strength to begin with, it would only be able to boost her Strength up one level, to OutstandingOutstanding(+3)(20), the level of the trait booster. If the character using a piece of gear with a trait booster has a higher level trait than that of the trait booster, her trait is actually lowered while she uses that gear. For instance, a character with ExtraordinaryExtraordinary(+4)(30) Strength using a powered exoskeleton with a Ou(+3)(20)Outstanding(+3)(20) Strength Boost sees her Strength drop to OutstandingOutstanding(+3)(20) while she uses it. The very mechanism that allows the exoskeleton to magnify the Strength of others prevents her from fully applying her own.

No trait booster can have a level of CommonCommon(0)(6) —there is simply no point— but a trait booster can have levels lower than that. This represents machines that are so poorly made that they actually interfere with their operators, such as automobiles with bad handling.

Some gear simply gives a (+1) situation modifier to the use of a particular skill, boosting a skill instead of a trait. A skill booster for the Medicine skill would be written as:

(+1) situation modifier when using the Medicine skill

— or —

(+1) bonus when using the Medicine skill

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Lending Power

Gear can, in effect, lend its skills, powers, and traits to its user while it is being used, such as when a telescope lends users the benefits of its Magnification trait. The GMGame Master should feel free to rename powers for a piece of gear if that will better help describe it. The Magnification trait of space helmet’s goggles could just as easily be named “telescopic sensors”, but remain unchanged when describing a telescope.

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Types of Gear

Armor

Armor has a Price trait, Material trait (Table 17), and lends the Armor power to its wearer. Elaborate magical or high-tech armor might also lend specific Adapted or Protection powers, or might boost its wearer’s traits; the powered armor of science fiction may have its traits grouped into subsystems.

Armor, and really any gear with a Material trait, should also list what it’s actually made of (boiled leather, high-carbon steel, nylon), because some powers only affect certain materials.

Weapons

Weapons for hand-to-hand combat have a Price trait and Material trait (Table 17). Weapons for distance combat also have a Range trait (Table 21) and a Damage trait.

Beyond traits, a weapon should also be described as either “blunt” or “sharp”, and if it isn’t obvious, whether the weapon is used for hand-to-hand or distance combat. A distance combat weapon also needs to list the number of “shots” it can make before needing to be reloaded.

Some distance combat weapons have features such as scopes, night-sights, and autofire that lend certain skills or powers to their users, such as Marksmanship, Night Vision, and Extra Attacks (see Skill Descriptions and Power Descriptions).

Computers

Computers have the Price, Material (Table 17), Power Reserve, Data Storage, and Intelligence Boost traits. Most have some sort of communication system as well. They may also have programs and information databases that lend skills to their users. When a character uses a computer to help research a problem, the time it takes to do the work is divided by the value of the Intelligence Boost trait.

Vehicles

Vehicles have Price, Material (Table 17), Capacity, Speed(Table 24), and Power Source or Power Reserve traits. Vehicles with exceptionally good or bad maneuverability may have an Agility trait boost.

A vehicle needs to list the number of “seats” it has, even if no one can actually sit in it, and whether being in the vehicle provides cover. A chariot may have one to four (standing) “seats” and offers cover, while a motorcycle offers one or two seats with no cover. If a vehicle has the Self-Sufficiency power, “seats” are also the number of people supported by whatever kind of life support system it has.

Kits

A tool box and a lock-picking set are both examples of kits: gear whose only relevant trait is the situation modifier it lends to a particular skill when used in the field. It cancels out the (-1) penalty for working away from a properly equipped garage / lab / hospital. All kits have a Price of Cm(0)(6)Common(0)(6).

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Pricing Gear

To come up with the cost for a piece of gear, start by making the Price trait’s level equal to the level of its highest level trait. Then, for every other trait of equal level or one level less, raise the Price by one level. For example:

Medieval English Longbow

Price: (see below)

  • Material: Pr(-1)(4)Poor(-1)(4), English yew wood
  • Range: Ou(+3)(20)Outstanding(+3)(20), 400 m (1,200 ft)
  • Damage: Cm(0)(6)Common(0)(6), sharp
  • Shots: 1

The highest level trait of a medieval English longbow is its Outstanding(+3)(20) Range. It has no other traits of equal level and no other traits at one level below OuOutstanding(+3)(20), so its final Price is OutstandingOutstanding(+3)(20). If your character tries to make a modern longbow from some Gr(+2)(15)Great(+2)(15) Material, GreatGreat(+2)(15) is one level below OutstandingOutstanding(+3)(20), so the Price of this longbow rises by one level to ExtraordinaryExtraordinary(+4)(30). In another example:

Modern-day HAZMAT (Hazardous Material) Suit

Price: (see below)

  • Material: Cm(0)(6)Common(0)(6), layered rubber and tyvek
  • Armor: Pr(-1)(4)Poor(-1)(4)
  • Protection from Poison: Ex(+4)(30)Extraordinary(+4)(30)
  • Protection from Disease: Ex(+4)(30)Extraordinary(+4)(30)
  • Protection from Corrosives: Ex(+4)(30)Extraordinary(+4)(30)
  • Protection from Radiation: Ex(+4)(30)Extraordinary(+4)(30)

The highest level trait on a modern-day HAZMAT suit is Ex(+4)(30)Extraordinary(+4)(30); in fact, it has four traits at that level. The Price starts at ExtraordinaryExtraordinary(+4)(30) to match one trait, then gets raised three levels for each of the other three ExExtraordinary(+4)(30) traits, to arrive at a WondrousWondrous(+7)(100) Price.

If a piece of gear is not portable (if it can’t be worn or carried in some bag on a character’s body), drop the Price one level. If a piece of gear cannot function without being constantly connected to some sort of infrastructure, such as a power grid, railroad tracks, or a phone network, drop the Price another level. A crystal ball 20 cm in diameter is portable, a 2 m tall looking glass is not; A mobile phone needs an infrastructure, a walkie-talkie does not.

Complex gear described by subsystems has an overall Price, but also has a Price trait for each subsystem. When coming up with an overall Price, the only traits to consider are the Price traits of each subsystem. This gear can be paid for one subsystem at a time, in “down-payments”, and can also be built one subsystem at a time.

The final Price trait is what a character pays when building something himself, when buying something that isn’t readily available to almost everyone, or when buying something that isn’t mass-produced. For common and mass-produced items, the GMGame Master may drop the Price by one to three levels.

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Building Gear

To be able to build gear, a character must have a skill that applies to whatever she’s trying to build, such as Alchemy or Arcana for anything magical, Mechanic or Engineer for a vehicle, Computers or Electronics or Programming for a robot, and Weaponsmith for any type of weapon or armor. The GMGame Master will decide, based on what your character tries to build, whether she has all the right skills or needs to call in help.

Building a piece of gear takes a number of days equal to the Price trait value. If the character can direct a crew of people to help him, the time is cut in half. At the end of that time, he must make an Intelligence check vs. the challenge level of GreatGreat(+2)(15) for something that is “normal” for the technology of the era in your story, OutstandingOutstanding(+3)(20) for something advanced for the era, and ExtraordinaryExtraordinary(+4)(30) for something beyond the technology of the era. If he had help, this can be a team action. Consequences of different result levels are shown below.

Table 32: Building Consequences
Result Level Result
DrDreadful(-3)(1)

Complete failure.

Start over with all new materials

but cut the build time by one quarter.

WkWeak(-2)(2)

Partial failure.

Spend half the original build time

making refinements, then try again.

PrPoor(-1)(4)

Partial failure.

Spend one quarter of the original build time

making refinements, then try again.

CmCommon(0)(6)

Partial success.

Complete 2 special requirements to finish.

GdGood(+1)(10)

Partial success.

Complete 1 special requirement to finish.

GrGreat(+2)(15) Complete success.
OuOutstanding(+3)(20) Complete success.
Special Requirements

If your character needs to complete one or more special requirements to finish her piece of gear, the GMGame Master must devise some sort of mission or quest for her to fulfill. Depending on the gear, it could be anything from “Wash the sword blade in fresh werewolf blood under a full moon” to “Expose the chassis to the pressure of the Marianas trench to harden its composite matrix” —anything to launch the characters into an adventure. Note that gear considered advanced for the era always has one more special requirement on top of any others; gear beyond the era always has two more special requirements.

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Repairing Gear

Repairing a piece of gear is similar to building it, requires the same skill it took to built it, takes a number of days equal to the points of damage it took, and is a GoodGood(+1)(10) level challenge. Repairs can be made in three-quarters the time by applying a (-1) penalty, in half the time with a (-2) penalty, and at one-quarter the time with a (-3) penalty.

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Buying Gear

Instead of spending Character Points, another way to buy gear is to have your character succeed in a contest pitting his Resourcefulness vs. the Price level of the gear in question. Several characters can even combine their money, resources, etc… to try to acquire an expensive item as a team action.

For a mundane item in plentiful supply (plastic chopsticks in modern-day Hong Kong), the GMGame Master may just rule that your character automatically succeeds in getting it without ever needing to make a Action Roll or spend Character Points.

— Table of Contents —

So What Now?

Look through the appendices; see what gear, skills, powers, or limitations appeal to you; start building characters —and start having fun!

— Table of Contents —

Gear Descriptions

Appendix I

Armor

Ancient Greek Leather Cuirass

Price: Cm(0)(6)Common(0)(6)

  • Material: Pr(-1)(4)Poor(-1)(4), boiled leather
  • Armor: Pr(-1)(4)Poor(-1)(4)
Thirteenth Century European Chain Mail Shirt

Price: Gr(+2)(15)Great(+2)(15)

  • Material: Gd(+1)(10)Good(+1)(10), steel links
  • Armor: Gd(+1)(10)Good(+1)(10)
Fourteenth Century Japanese Samurai O-yoroi Armor

Price: Ou(+3)(20)Outstanding(+3)(20)

  • Material: Gd(+1)(10)Good(+1)(10), steel plates and leather lacing
  • Armor: Gr(+2)(15)Great(+2)(15)

Nineteenth Century Zulu Ishlangu Shield

Price: Pr(-1)(4)Poor(-1)(4)

  • Material: Wk(-2)(2)Weak(-2)(2), cowhide and wood
  • Armor: Wk(-2)(2)Weak(-2)(2)
Mid-Twentieth Century US Flak Jacket

Price: Cm(0)(6)Common(0)(6)

  • Material: Cm(0)(6)Common(0)(6), nylon
  • Armor: Wk(-2)(2)Weak(-2)(2)
Mid-Twentieth Century Soviet Space Suit

Price: Gr(+2)(15)Great(+2)(15)

  • Material: Cm(0)(6)Common(0)(6), nylon
  • Armor: Wk(-2)(2)Weak(-2)(2)
  • Protection from Radiation: Gd(+1)(10)Good(+1)(10)
  • Self-sufficiency: Wk(-2)(2)Weak(-2)(2), 2 hours of outside of vehicle
Modern-day “Bullet-Proof” Vest

Price: Gr(+2)(15)Great(+2)(15)

  • Material: Gd(+1)(10)Good(+1)(10), ballistic cloth and ceramic plates
  • Armor: Cm(0)(6)Common(0)(6)
Modern-day HAZMAT (Hazardous Material) Suit

Price: Wo(+7)(100)Wondrous(+7)(100)

  • Material: Pr(-1)(4)Poor(-1)(4), layered rubber and tyvek
  • Armor: Pr(-1)(4)Poor(-1)(4)
  • Protection from Poison: Ex(+4)(30)Extraordinary(+4)(30)
  • Protection from Disease: Ex(+4)(30)Extraordinary(+4)(30)
  • Protection from Corrosives: Ex(+4)(30)Extraordinary(+4)(30)
  • Protection from Radiation: Ex(+4)(30)Extraordinary(+4)(30)
Fantasy Fiction Leather Armor

Price: Fa(+6)(60)Fantastic(+6)(60)

  • Material: Fa(+6)(60)Fantastic(+6)(60), mystically reinforced dragon hide
  • Armor: Gd(+1)(10)Good(+1)(10)
  • Protection from Fire: Ex(+4)(30)Extraordinary(+4)(30)
  • Protection from Corrosives: Ex(+4)(30)Extraordinary(+4)(30)
Science Fiction Powered Battle Suit

Price: M1Magnitude 1 \ Gr(+2)(15)Great(+2)(15)

Structural Subsystem

Price: Wo(+7)(100)Wondrous(+7)(100)

  • Material: Ex(+4)(30)Extraordinary(+4)(30), ceramics and carbon composites
  • Strength Boost: Ex(+4)(30)Extraordinary(+4)(30)
  • Endurance Boost: Ph(+5)(40)Phenomenal(+5)(40)

Weapons Subsystem

Price: Ph(+5)(40)Phenomenal(+5)(40)

  • Thunder Cannon: Ex(+4)(30)Extraordinary(+4)(30) sound projection
  • Lightning Gun: Ou(+3)(20)Outstanding(+3)(20) electrical projection

Defensive Subsystem

Price: Fa(+6)(60)Fantastic(+6)(60)

  • Armor: Ex(+4)(30)Extraordinary(+4)(30)
  • Protection from Energy Attacks: Ph(+5)(40)Phenomenal(+5)(40)

Power / Propulsion Subsystem

Price: Ph(+5)(40)Phenomenal(+5)(40)

  • Power Reserve: Ou(+3)(20)Outstanding(+3)(20), 20 hours of operation
  • Speed - Air: Ph(+5)(40)Phenomenal(+5)(40), 480 kph (300 mph)

Sensors Subsystem

Price: Ph(+5)(40)Phenomenal(+5)(40)

  • IR Sight: Ou(+3)(20)Outstanding(+3)(20)
  • Night Sight: Ou(+3)(20)Outstanding(+3)(20)
  • Telescopic Sights: Ou(+3)(20)Outstanding(+3)(20) x200 magnification

Communication Subsystem

Price: Ou(+3)(20)Outstanding(+3)(20)

  • Signal Range: Cm(0)(6)Common(0)(6), 12 km (7.5 mi)
  • Protection from Jamming: Gd(+1)(10)Good(+1)(10)
  • Protection from Decoding: Gr(+2)(15)Great(+2)(15)

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Weapons

Thirteenth Century American Tomahawk Axe

Price: Gr(+2)(15)Great(+2)(15)

  • Material: Gd(+1)(10)Good(+1)(10), stone and wood
  • Range: Dr(-3)(1)Dreadful(-3)(1), 20m (60ft)
  • Damage: Gd(+1)(10)Good(+1)(10), sharp
  • Shots: 1
Fourteenth Century Japanese Katana Sword

Price: Ou(+3)(20)Outstanding(+3)(20)

  • Material: Ou(+3)(20)Outstanding(+3)(20), high-carbon steel, sharp
Medieval English Longbow

Price: Ou(+3)(20)Outstanding(+3)(20)

  • Material: Pr(-1)(4)Poor(-1)(4), English yew wood
  • Range: Ou(+3)(20)Outstanding(+3)(20), 400 m (1,200 ft)
  • Damage: Cm(0)(6)Common(0)(6), sharp
  • Shots: 1
Mid-Twentieth Century Italian 9mm M951R Beretta Pistol

Price: Ex(+4)(30)Extraordinary(+4)(30)

  • Material: Gd(+1)(10)Good(+1)(10), aluminum
  • Range: Ou(+3)(20)Outstanding(+3)(20), 400 m (1,200 ft)
  • Damage: Cm(0)(6)Common(0)(6), sharp
  • Shots: 10
  • Extra Attacks: +9
Mid-Twentieth Century Soviet AK-47 Automatic Rifle

Price: Ex(+4)(30)Extraordinary(+4)(30)

  • Material: Gd(+1)(10)Good(+1)(10), aluminum and wood
  • Range: Ex(+4)(30)Extraordinary(+4)(30), 600 m (1,800 ft)
  • Damage: Gr(+2)(15)Great(+2)(15), sharp
  • Shots: 30
  • Extra Attacks: +9
Modern-day Black Market Pistol

Price: Gd(+1)(10)Good(+1)(10)

  • Material: Cm(0)(6)Common(0)(6), aluminum and plastic
  • Range: Wk(-2)(2)Weak(-2)(2), 40 m (120 ft)
  • Damage: Cm(0)(6)Common(0)(6), sharp
  • Shots: 6
Modern-day Knife

Price: Gd(+1)(10)Good(+1)(10)

  • Material: Gd(+1)(10)Good(+1)(10), steel, sharp
Modern-day Smoke Grenade

Price: Ex(+4)(30)Extraordinary(+4)(30)

  • Material: Cm(0)(6)Common(0)(6), tin
  • Range: Wk(-2)(2)Weak(-2)(2), 20 m (60 ft)
  • Damage: Dr(-3)(1)Dreadful(-3)(1), none
  • Blinding Attack: Cm(0)(6)Common(0)(6) darkness
  • Shots: 1
Modern-day Whip

Price: Gd(+1)(10)Good(+1)(10)

  • Material: Pr(-1)(4)Poor(-1)(4), braided leather
  • Entangling Attack: Gd(+1)(10)Good(+1)(10)
Fantasy Fiction Enchanted Sword

Price: Fa(+6)(60)Fantastic(+6)(60)

  • Material: Fa(+6)(60)Fantastic(+6)(60), enchanted steel, sharp
  • Project Light: Cm(0)(6)Common(0)(6)

    On a mental command, the sword can give off a soft golden glow that can be used like a lantern or torch.

  • Detect “Demons”: Ex(+4)(30)Extraordinary(+4)(30)

    In the presence of other-worldly creatures with an Evil Reputation trait, the sword’s gold glow turns red. When pointed in the direction of such a creature, the light pulses; the faster the pulse, the closer they are. The sword’s detection range is 400 m (1,200 ft).

  • “Cleansing Light of Day”: Ex(+4)(30)Extraordinary(+4)(30) light energy

    For up to 30 turns a day, the sword can burn white-hot with a full-spectrum light equal to concentrated sunlight, and inflict an extra 30 points of damage to anything that touches the blade.

  • Protection from Magical Possession: Gr(+2)(15)Great(+2)(15)

    This weapon bonds to the mind of its owner. It will only work for another if it is given away as a gift, or if the original owner dies. It will resist serving someone with an Evil Reputation trait.

Science Fiction Laser Pistol

Price: Ph(+5)(40)Phenomenal(+5)(40)

  • Material: Gd(+1)(10)Good(+1)(10), ceramic-metal mix
  • Range: Ph(+5)(40)Phenomenal(+5)(40), 800 m (2,400 ft)
  • Damage: Gr(+2)(15)Great(+2)(15), sharp
  • Shots: 1,000
  • Extra Attacks: +4
  • Laser Sight: Gd(+1)(10)Good(+1)(10); Ignore all range modifiers.
  • Biometric Security: Gd(+1)(10)Good(+1)(10); Once programmed, will only work when it detects its owner’s handprints / fingerprints.

— Table of Contents —

Computers

Modern-day Laptop Computer

Price: Ph(+5)(40)Phenomenal(+5)(40)

  • Material: Gd(+1)(10)Good(+1)(10), aluminum shell and electronics
  • Power Reserve: Cm(0)(6)Common(0)(6), 6 hours of operation
  • Data Storage: Ex(+4)(30)Extraordinary(+4)(30)
  • Intelligence Boost: Ou(+3)(20)Outstanding(+3)(20)
  • Wireless Modem: Dr(-3)(1)Dreadful(-3)(1) signal range

— Table of Contents —

Vehicles

Muscle-powered Vehicles
Modern-day Bicycle

Price: Ou(+3)(20)Outstanding(+3)(20)

  • Material: Gd(+1)(10)Good(+1)(10), aluminum
  • Speed Boost: Gr(+2)(15)Great(+2)(15)
Modern-day Rollerblades

Price: Gd(+1)(10)Good(+1)(10)

  • Material: Pr(-1)(4)Poor(-1)(4), plastic and aluminum
  • Speed Boost: Gd(+1)(10)Good(+1)(10)
Modern-day Skis

Price: Ou(+3)(20)Outstanding(+3)(20)

  • Material: Pr(-1)(4)Poor(-1)(4), carbon-plastic composite
  • Speed Boost: Ou(+3)(20)Outstanding(+3)(20)
Modern-day Wheelchair

Price: Gr(+2)(15)Great(+2)(15)

  • Material: Gd(+1)(10)Good(+1)(10), aluminum
  • Speed Boost: Gd(+1)(10)Good(+1)(10)
Land Vehicles
Modern-day Motorcycle

Price: Ph(+5)(40)Phenomenal(+5)(40)

Structural Subsystem

Price: Ex(+4)(30)Extraordinary(+4)(30)

  • Material: Gr(+2)(15)Great(+2)(15), aluminum and steel
  • Seats: 2, no cover
  • Agility Boost: Ex(+4)(30)Extraordinary(+4)(30)

Power / Propulsion Subsystem

Price: Ou(+3)(20)Outstanding(+3)(20);

  • Power Reserve: Gd(+1)(10)Good(+1)(10), 10 hours of operation
  • Speed - Land: Ou(+3)(20)Outstanding(+3)(20), 240 kph (150 mph)

Sensors Subsystem

Price: Gd(+1)(10)Good(+1)(10)

  • Headlamp: Gd(+1)(10)Good(+1)(10) night sight
Modern-day Sedan / Taxi / Lorry

Price: Ex(+4)(30)Extraordinary(+4)(30)

Structural Subsystem

Price: Gr(+2)(15)Great(+2)(15)

  • Material: Gr(+2)(15)Great(+2)(15), aluminum and steel
  • Seats: 4, cover

Power / Propulsion Subsystem

Price: Gr(+2)(15)Great(+2)(15)

  • Power Reserve: Cm(0)(6)Common(0)(6), 6 hours of operation
  • Speed - Land: Gd(+1)(10)Good(+1)(10), 120 kph (75 mph)

Sensors Subsystem

Price: Gd(+1)(10)Good(+1)(10)

  • Headlamps: Gd(+1)(10)Good(+1)(10) night sight
Modern-day Sportscar

Price: Ph(+5)(40)Phenomenal(+5)(40)

Structural Subsystem

Price: Ex(+4)(30)Extraordinary(+4)(30)

  • Material: Gr(+2)(15)Great(+2)(15), aluminum and fiberglass
  • Seats: 2, cover
  • Agility Boost: Ex(+4)(30)Extraordinary(+4)(30)

Power / Propulsion Subsystem

Price: Ex(+4)(30)Extraordinary(+4)(30)

  • Power Reserve: Pr(-1)(4)Poor(-1)(4), 4 hours of operation
  • Speed - Land: Ex(+4)(30)Extraordinary(+4)(30), 360 kph (225 mph)

Sensors Subsystem

Price: Gd(+1)(10)Good(+1)(10)

  • Headlamps: Gd(+1)(10)Good(+1)(10) night sight
Modern-day Van / Ambulance

Price: Ex(+4)(30)Extraordinary(+4)(30)

Structural Subsystem

Price: Gr(+2)(15)Great(+2)(15)

  • Material: Gr(+2)(15)Great(+2)(15), aluminum and steel
  • Seats: 5, cover

Power / Propulsion Subsystem

Price: Gr(+2)(15)Great(+2)(15)

  • Power Reserve: Cm(0)(6)Common(0)(6), 6 hours of operation
  • Speed - Land: Gd(+1)(10)Good(+1)(10), 120 kph (75 mph)

Sensors Subsystem

Price: Gd(+1)(10)Good(+1)(10)

  • Headlamps: Gd(+1)(10)Good(+1)(10) night sight
Water Vehicles
Modern-day Sail Boat

Price: Cm(0)(6)Common(0)(6)

Structural Subsystem

Price: Pr(-1)(4)Poor(-1)(4)

  • Material: Pr(-1)(4)Poor(-1)(4), wood
  • Seats: 6, no cover

Power / Propulsion Subsystem

Price: Pr(-1)(4)Poor(-1)(4)

  • Power Reserve: NANot Applicable, wind-powered
  • Speed - Water: Pr(-1)(4)Poor(-1)(4), 48 kph (30 mph)
Modern-day Speed Boat

Price: Ex(+4)(30)Extraordinary(+4)(30)

Structural Subsystem

Price: Ou(+3)(20)Outstanding(+3)(20)

  • Material: Gr(+2)(15)Great(+2)(15), fiberglass
  • Seats: 4, no cover
  • Agility Boost: Gr(+2)(15)Great(+2)(15)

Power / Propulsion Subsystem

Price: Gr(+2)(15)Great(+2)(15)

  • Power Reserve: Cm(0)(6)Common(0)(6), 6 hours of operation
  • Speed - Water: Gr(+2)(15)Great(+2)(15), 180 kph (122.5 mph)
Modern-day Tug Boat

Price: Ou(+3)(20)Outstanding(+3)(20)

Structural Subsystem

Price: Pr(-1)(4)Poor(-1)(4)

  • Material: Pr(-1)(4)Poor(-1)(4), wood
  • Seats: 10, cover

Power / Propulsion Subsystem

Price: Ou(+3)(20)Outstanding(+3)(20)

  • Power Reserve: Ou(+3)(20)Outstanding(+3)(20), 20 hours of operation
  • Speed - Water: Gd(+1)(10)Good(+1)(10), 120 kph (75 mph)
Air Vehicles
Modern-day Glider

Price: Gd(+1)(10)Good(+1)(10)

Structural Subsystem

Price: Pr(-1)(4)Poor(-1)(4)

  • Material: Pr(-1)(4)Poor(-1)(4), aluminum and nylon
  • Seats: 1, no cover

Power / Propulsion Subsystem

Price: Gd(+1)(10)Good(+1)(10)

  • Power Reserve: NANot Applicable, wind-powered
  • Speed - Air: Gd(+1)(10)Good(+1)(10), 120 kph (75 mph)
Modern-day Ultralight

Price: Gr(+2)(15)Great(+2)(15)

Structural Subsystem

Price: Pr(-1)(4)Poor(-1)(4)

  • Material: Pr(-1)(4)Poor(-1)(4), aluminum and nylon
  • Seats: 1, no cover

Power / Propulsion Subsystem

Price: Gr(+2)(15)Great(+2)(15)

  • Power Reserve: Pr(-1)(4)Poor(-1)(4), 4 hours of operation
  • Speed - Air: Gr(+2)(15)Great(+2)(15), 180 kph (100 mph)
Modern-day Helicopter

Price: Ou(+3)(20)Outstanding(+3)(20)

Structural Subsystem

Price: Cm(0)(6)Common(0)(6)

  • Material: Cm(0)(6)Common(0)(6), aluminum and plexiglas
  • Seats: 4, cover

Power / Propulsion Subsystem

Price: Ou(+3)(20)Outstanding(+3)(20)

  • Power Reserve: Cm(0)(6)Common(0)(6), 6 hours of operation
  • Speed - Air: Ou(+3)(20)Outstanding(+3)(20), 240 kph (150 mph)

Sensors Subsystem

Price: Gd(+1)(10)Good(+1)(10)

  • Radar: Gd(+1)(10)Good(+1)(10) sense other flying objects
Modern-day Cesna Prop Plane

Price: Ex(+4)(30)Extraordinary(+4)(30)

Structural Subsystem

Price: Gd(+1)(10)Good(+1)(10)

  • Material: Gd(+1)(10)Good(+1)(10), aluminum
  • Seats: 4, cover

Power / Propulsion Subsystem

Price: Ex(+4)(30)Extraordinary(+4)(30)

  • Power Reserve: Cm(0)(6)Common(0)(6), 6 hours of operation
  • Speed - Air:Ex(+4)(30)Extraordinary(+4)(30), 360 kph (225 mph)

Sensors Subsystem

Price: Gd(+1)(10)Good(+1)(10)

  • Radar: Gd(+1)(10)Good(+1)(10) sense other flying objects
Modern-day Lear Jet Plane

Price: Ph(+5)(40)Phenomenal(+5)(40)

Structural Subsystem

Price: Gd(+1)(10)Good(+1)(10)

  • Material: Gd(+1)(10)Good(+1)(10), aluminum
  • Seats: 10, cover

Power / Propulsion Subsystem

Price: Ph(+5)(40)Phenomenal(+5)(40)

  • Power Reserve: Gd(+1)(10)Good(+1)(10), 10 hours of operation
  • Speed - Air: Ph(+5)(40)Phenomenal(+5)(40), 480 kph (300 mph)

Sensors Subsystem

Price: Gd(+1)(10)Good(+1)(10)

  • Radar: Gd(+1)(10)Good(+1)(10) sense other flying objects
Space Vehicles
Twentieth Century US Space Shuttle

Price: M2Magnitude 2 \ Ex(+4)(30)Extraordinary(+4)(30)

Structural Subsystem

Price: Wo(+7)(100)Wondrous(+7)(100)

  • Material: Gr(+2)(15)Great(+2)(15), steel and carbon composites
  • Seats: 6, cover
  • Capacity: Wo(+7)(100)Wondrous(+7)(100), 20 tonnes (20 tons)
  • Self-Sufficiency: Cm(0)(6)Common(0)(6), 6 days

Power / Propulsion Subsystem

Price: M2Magnitude 2 \ Ex(+4)(30)Extraordinary(+4)(30)

  • Power Source: Cm(0)(6)Common(0)(6), 6 days of operation
  • Speed - Air & Space: M2Magnitude 2 \ Ex(+4)(30)Extraordinary(+4)(30)

Sensors Subsystem

Price: Gd(+1)(10)Good(+1)(10)

  • Radar: Gd(+1)(10)Good(+1)(10) sense other flying objects
Science Fiction Rocket Pack

Price: Ex(+4)(30)Extraordinary(+4)(30)

Structural Subsystem

Price: Gr(+2)(15)Great(+2)(15)

  • Material: Gr(+2)(15)Great(+2)(15), aluminum and steel
  • Seats: 1, no cover

Power / Propulsion Subsystem

Price: Ou(+3)(20)Outstanding(+3)(20)

  • Power Reserve: Gd(+1)(10)Good(+1)(10), 10 hours of operation
  • Speed - Air: Ou(+3)(20)Outstanding(+3)(20), 240 kph (150 mph)
Science Fiction Space Cruiser

Price: M2Magnitude 2 \ Ex(+4)(30)Extraordinary(+4)(30)

Structural Subsystem

Price: Wo(+7)(100)Wondrous(+7)(100)

  • Material: Fa(+6)(60)Fantastic(+6)(60), carbon composite matrix
  • Seats: 6, cover
  • Agility Boost: Ex(+4)(30)Extraordinary(+4)(30)
  • Capacity: Gd(+1)(10)Good(+1)(10), 2 tonnes (2 tons)
  • Self-Sufficiency: Ph(+5)(40)Phenomenal(+5)(40), 40 days

Weapons Subsystem

Price: M1Magnitude 1 \ Gr(+2)(15)Great(+2)(15)

  • Forward Plasma Cannon: Wo(+7)(100)Wondrous(+7)(100)
  • Port / Starboard Lasers: Ph(+5)(40)Phenomenal(+5)(40)
  • Missile Launcher
  • Range: Wo(+7)(100)Wondrous(+7)(100), 1 km
  • Damage: Ph(+5)(40)Phenomenal(+5)(40)
  • Shots: 12

Defensive Subsystem

Price: Ph(+5)(40)Phenomenal(+5)(40)

  • Protection from Energy Attacks: Ph(+5)(40)Phenomenal(+5)(40)
  • Protection from Physical Attacks: Ou(+3)(20)Outstanding(+3)(20)

Power / Propulsion Subsystem

Price: M2Magnitude 2 \ Ex(+4)(30)Extraordinary(+4)(30)

  • Power Source: Ph(+5)(40)Phenomenal(+5)(40), 40 days
  • Power Reserve: Ph(+5)(40)Phenomenal(+5)(40), 40 hours backup power
  • Speed - Air & Space: M2Magnitude 2 \ Ex(+4)(30)Extraordinary(+4)(30)
  • FTL Drive: Pr(-1)(4)Poor(-1)(4), lightspeed x 40

Sensors Subsystem

Price: Fa(+6)(60)Fantastic(+6)(60)

  • Telescope: Ex(+4)(30)Extraordinary(+4)(30)
  • Spectrometer: Ou(+3)(20)Outstanding(+3)(20)
  • Densiometer: Ou(+3)(20)Outstanding(+3)(20)
  • Radar: Gr(+2)(15)Great(+2)(15)

Communication Subsystem

Price: Ex(+4)(30)Extraordinary(+4)(30)

  • Signal Range: Gr(+2)(15)Great(+2)(15), coded microwave emitter
  • Protection from Jamming: Gr(+2)(15)Great(+2)(15)
  • Protection from Decoding: Gr(+2)(15)Great(+2)(15)

Computer Subsystem

Price: Ex(+4)(30)Extraordinary(+4)(30)

  • Data Storage: Ou(+3)(20)Outstanding(+3)(20)
  • Intelligence Boost: Ou(+3)(20)Outstanding(+3)(20)
  • Programs: Astronavigation

— Table of Contents —

Kits

Lockpicking Tools
  • (+1) bonus when using Escape Artist or Lockpicking skills.
Mechanic’s Tools
  • (+1) bonus when using the Mechanic skill in the field.
Medicine Bag
  • (+1) bonus when using the Medicine skill in the field.
Electronics Tool Kit
  • (+1) bonus when using the Electronics skill in the field.
Forensics Kit
  • (+1) bonus when using the Detective skill in the field to analyze physical evidence.
Climbing / Spelunking Equipment
  • (+1) bonus when climbing.

— Table of Contents —

More Handy Gear

Scuba Gear

Price: Gr(+2)(15)Great(+2)(15)

  • Material: Cm(0)(6)Common(0)(6), rubber
  • Protection from Cold: Gd(+1)(10)Good(+1)(10)
  • Self-Sufficiency: Dr(-3)(1)Dreadful(-3)(1), air only
  • Speed Boost: Gd(+1)(10)Good(+1)(10), underwater only
Binoculars

Price: Cm(0)(6)Common(0)(6)

  • Material: Pr(-1)(4)Poor(-1)(4), metal and glass
  • Magnification: Wk(-2)(2)Weak(-2)(2), x20
Fire Extinguisher

Price: Gd(+1)(10)Good(+1)(10)

  • Material: Gd(+1)(10)Good(+1)(10), metal
  • Fire Suppression: Pr(-1)(4)Poor(-1)(4)
Gas Mask

Price: Ou(+3)(20)Outstanding(+3)(20)

  • Material: Cm(0)(6)Common(0)(6), rubber
  • Protection from Poison: Ou(+3)(20)Outstanding(+3)(20), gases only
Nightvision Goggles

Price: Gd(+1)(10)Good(+1)(10)

  • Material: Pr(-1)(4)Poor(-1)(4), metal and glass
  • Night Sight: Cm(0)(6)Common(0)(6)
Handcuffs / Manacles

Price: Gr(+2)(15)Great(+2)(15)

  • Material: Gr(+2)(15)Great(+2)(15), steel
Science Fiction Maintenance Robot

Price: Ph(+5)(40)Phenomenal(+5)(40)

Structural Subsystem

Price: Ou(+3)(20)Outstanding(+3)(20), ceramic and plastic shell

  • Brawling: Dr(-3)(1)Dreadful(-3)(1)
  • Agility: Gd(+1)(10)Good(+1)(10)
  • Strength: Ou(+3)(20)Outstanding(+3)(20)
  • Endurance: Gd(+1)(10)Good(+1)(10)
  • Health Points: 40
  • Contains the equivalent of the Mechanic’s Tools kit

Power / Propulsion Subsystem

Price: Ph(+5)(40)Phenomenal(+5)(40)

  • Power Reserve: Ph(+5)(40)Phenomenal(+5)(40), 40 hours
  • Speed - Land: Wk(-2)(2)Weak(-2)(2), 24 kph (15 mph)

Sensors Subsystem

Price: Cm(0)(6)Common(0)(6)

  • Camera Eye: Cm(0)(6)Common(0)(6)
  • Radar: Wk(-2)(2)Weak(-2)(2)

Communication Subsystem

Price: Dr(-3)(1)Dreadful(-3)(1)

  • Signal Range: Dr(-3)(1)Dreadful(-3)(1), radio transmitter

Computer Subsystem

  • Programs: Mechanic, Electronics
Science Fiction Security Robot

Price: M1Magnitude 1 \ Gr(+2)(15)Great(+2)(15)

Structural Subsystem

Price: Ph(+5)(40)Phenomenal(+5)(40)

  • Material: Gr(+2)(15)Great(+2)(15), carbon composites
  • Armor: Ex(+4)(30)Extraordinary(+4)(30)

Power / Propulsion Subsystem

Price: Ph(+5)(40)Phenomenal(+5)(40)

  • Power Reserve: Ph(+5)(40)Phenomenal(+5)(40), 40 hours
  • Speed - Air: Pr(-1)(4)Poor(-1)(4), 48 kph (30 mph)

Weapons Subsystem

Price: Ph(+5)(40)Phenomenal(+5)(40)

  • Laser: Ex(+4)(30)Extraordinary(+4)(30)
  • Machine Guns
  • Range: Ex(+4)(30)Extraordinary(+4)(30), 600 m (1,800 ft)
  • Damage: Gr(+2)(15)Great(+2)(15)
  • Shots: 3,000
  • Extra Attacks: +3

Sensors Subsystem

Price: Ou(+3)(20)Outstanding(+3)(20)

  • Camera Eye: Cm(0)(6)Common(0)(6)
  • Infrared Sensors: Gd(+1)(10)Good(+1)(10)
  • Audio Sensors: Gd(+1)(10)Good(+1)(10)
  • Radar: Wk(-2)(2)Weak(-2)(2)

Communication Subsystem

Price: Ex(+4)(30)Extraordinary(+4)(30)

  • Signal Range: Wk(-2)(2)Weak(-2)(2), coded microwave emitter
  • Protection from Jamming: Ou(+3)(20)Outstanding(+3)(20)
  • Protection from Decoding: Gr(+2)(15)Great(+2)(15)

Computer Subsystem

Price: Ou(+3)(20)Outstanding(+3)(20)

  • Intelligence: Pr(-1)(4)Poor(-1)(4)
  • Perception: Ou(+3)(20)Outstanding(+3)(20)
  • Programs: Aerial Combat, Fast Draw, Firearms, Navigation, Marksmanship, Pressure Points

— Table of Contents —

Skill Descriptions

Appendix II

Practical & Survival Skills

  • Culture / Customs: 1You must specify an application for this skill; You can buy several different applications of this skill.
  • Language: 1You must specify an application for this skill; You can buy several different applications of this skill.
  • Local Geography: 1You must specify an application for this skill; You can buy several different applications of this skill.
  • Profession: 1You must specify an application for this skill; You can buy several different applications of this skill.
  • Survival: 1You must specify an application for this skill; You can buy several different applications of this skill.
  • Riding
  • Tracking: 1You must specify an application for this skill; You can buy several different applications of this skill.
  • Vehicle: 1You must specify an application for this skill; You can buy several different applications of this skill.

Knowledge Skills

Weapon Skills

Practical & Survival Skills
Culture / Customs: 1You must specify an application for this skill; You can buy several different applications of this skill.

This skill gives your character knowledge about the culture and customs of a specific group of people. It gives her a (+1) bonus in social situations with them, or when trying to understand their behavior. One specific application of this skill(Culture / Customs: The Tlingit, Culture / Customs: hackers, Culture / Customs: homeless people, Culture / Customs: Danish nobility) must be chosen when this skill is bought. In some situations, this skill makes some checks unnecessary. For instance, a character who understands Doh Luo culture would automatically remember the traditional greeting said when entering a home. An Intelligence check with a GoodGood(+1)(10) result might be needed to notice an impostor among a group of Tibetan monks, based on whether or not one slipped up a ritual. Trying to negotiate safe passage through a gang’s turf in terms they can respect may require a GreatGreat(+2)(15) result. Remembering the semi-secret handshake of an occult order may require a OutstandingOutstanding(+3)(20) result. This skill can be bought multiple times, each time for a different group of people.

Language: 1You must specify an application for this skill; You can buy several different applications of this skill.

Every character knows one language by default. Each time this skill is bought, your character learns another language, whose dialect or accent (e.g.: French (Quebec), French (Cajun), French (Normandy), French (Algeria)) must be specified. It is assumed that people who speak different dialects of the same language understand each other, but cannot pass as a native speaker of the other’s homeland. If most people in your story are literate, every character is assumed to be able to read and write in every language that he knows —unless the GMGame Master rules that something unusual in his background precludes this, or unless a language has no written form.

Local Geography: 1You must specify an application for this skill; You can buy several different applications of this skill.

This skill gives your character a (+1) bonus in any actions that would benefit from a knowledge of the government, economy, crime, or layout of a specific geographic region. It could be one country (Local Geography: Peru); one province, prefecture, or state (Local Geography: Nova Scotia, Local Geography: Wales); one city (Local Geography: Tel Aviv); or even one neighborhood (Local Geography: Tokyo’s Ginza District). The smaller the region, the more specific the information. This skill makes some checks unnecessary. For instance, a character who knows the local geography of a city already knows which bus route goes to the airport. On the other hand, that character may need a GoodGood(+1)(10) result on her Intelligence check to remember where to find the best Thai cuisine in town. A GreatGreat(+2)(15) result may be required to remember that the constable is related to the parish priest. Obscure local trivia, such as the location of rarely used shortcuts, would require a OutstandingOutstanding(+3)(20) result. This skill can be bought multiple times, each for a different geographic region.

Profession: 1You must specify an application for this skill; You can buy several different applications of this skill.

A character with this skill knows a specific trade (e.g.: Profession: Bricklayer, Profession: Accountant, Profession: Cook) well enough to earn a living at it. This skill can represent the “day job” of heroes whose exploits are not sponsored by some well-funded organization. It also provides a (+1) bonus to any actions that might benefit from the knowledge of a specific trade. This skill can be bought multiple times, each time for a different trade.

Survival: 1You must specify an application for this skill; You can buy several different applications of this skill.

Your character knows enough about a specific environment to be able to automatically find enough food and shelter there to keep himself alive. A Resourcefulness check with a GoodGood(+1)(10) result allows him to find enough food and shelter for one other person; a GreatGreat(+2)(15) result allows him to also feed and shelter two people beside himself, and a OutstandingOutstanding(+3)(20) result lets him take care of three people beyond himself. He also gets a (+1) bonus when trying to avoid the most common hazards in that environment. This skill can be bought multiple times; each time a different environment must be specified (e.g.: Survival: Arctic, Survival: Desert, Survival: Urban).

Riding

This skill gives your character the ability to mount trained riding animals, from horses to camels to elephants, and even attempt stunts such as jumping fences and flying dismounts, getting a (+1) bonus when doing so.

Tracking: 1You must specify an application for this skill; You can buy several different applications of this skill.

This skill allows a character to track a quarry across a specific terrain (e.g.: Tracking: Forrest, Tracking: Desert). It can be bought multiple times, each time for a different type of terrain. A specialized form of tracking, Tracking: Records, allows the movements and activities of someone to be tracked through the trail left in modern-day record systems (taxes, medical, financial, reservations, etc…).

Vehicle: 1You must specify an application for this skill; You can buy several different applications of this skill.

A character with this skill knows how to drive / pilot one type of vehicle, which must be specified when this skill is bought (e.g.: Vehicle: Motorcycle, Vehicle: Spaceship, Vehicle: Boat), and gives a (+1) bonus to any actions attempted with the vehicle. This skill can be purchased multiple times, each time for a different type of vehicle.

Building & Repairing Skills
Alchemy

Your character can create compounds (potions, elixirs, etc…) that do not follow the commonly understood principles of chemistry and physics, which can only be made through magic, and which can themselves create magical effects.

Computers

This skill gives your character the ability to design, build, and repair computers, including those inside other devices, from spaceships to robots. It gives a (+1) bonus to any Intelligence checks that would benefit from a knowledge of computers.

Electronics

Your character understands the principles of electronics and knows about electrical gear. She gets a (+1) bonus to any actions that would benefit from a knowledge of electronics.

Engineer

This skill gives a (+1) bonus to any attempts at designing, building, or repairing gear, or to understanding how a piece of gear might work.

Mechanic

A character with this skill has a knack for fixing things, and gets a (+1) bonus to any attempts at repairing a piece of gear.

Programming

Your character has the ability to write, debug, correct, and change computer programs. It gives a (+1) bonus to any Intelligence checks that might benefit from this knowledge.

Weaponsmith

A character with this skill knows how to make the tools of war, and gets a (+1) bonus to any attempts at designing, building, or repairing weapons and armor.

Knowledge Skills
Arcana

Your character knows about “supernatural” phenomena, ancient legends and lore, “the occult”, and magic. He gets a (+1) bonus to any actions that benefit from this knowledge.

Astronavigation

This skill gives your character the ability to plot routes through outer space and select ones that are faster, safer, or use less fuel. It also gives a (+1) bonus to any actions that would benefit from a knowledge of planetary / stellar motion.

Archeology

A character with this skill can understand other cultures, extinct creatures, and lost civilizations by the remains they left behind. She can sometimes apply this skill to “detective work”. She also gets a (+1) bonus to any checks that would benefit from a knowledge of archeology.

Biology

Your character knows the science of life: how different lifeforms function and interact with each other, and gets a (+1) situation modifier to any actions that benefit from that knowledge.

Chemistry

Your character knows the science of matter: the properties of different compounds and how they combine and transform. This skill gives a (+1) bonus to any checks that would benefit from this type of knowledge.

First Aid

If a character with this skill attends to a dying character, he can be permanently stabilized and brought back up to one Health Point. Anyone under the care of this character can recover an extra number of Health Points (equal to his Endurance trait value) per day. It also gives a (+1) bonus to any actions that would benefit from a knowledge of first aid.

Geology

This skill gives a (+1) situation modifier to any actions that would benefit from a knowledge of the structure and composition of the Earth (or some other planet).

Knowledge: 1You must specify an application for this skill; You can buy several different applications of this skill.

A character with this skill is well-versed in one particular subject not covered by other Knowledge skills. An area of expertise must be specified (e.g.: Knowledge: Cattle Breeding, Knowledge: The Bauhaus Movement, Knowledge: Poisons). It gives a (+1) bonus to any Intelligence checks that might benefit from knowledge of the subject.

Medicine 2This skill costs twice as much as other skills.

If a character with this skill attends to a dying character, she can be permanently stabilized and brought back up to one Health Point. Anyone under the care of this character can recover an extra number of Health Points (equal to his Endurance trait value), and one level in any trait, per day. This skill also gives a (+1) bonus to any actions that would benefit from a knowledge of medicine. This skill costs twice as much as other skills.

Navigation

Your character can find his way around using anything from the position of the sun, to constellations, to the currents of wind and water, to a compass, charts, and GPS. He gets a (+1) bonus to his Intelligence check when plotting a course on a planet and when trying to get “un-lost”.

Physics

This skill gives a (+1) bonus to any checks that would benefit from a knowledge of the fundamental components and forces of the universe.

Psychology

A character with this skill can attempt to heal mental illness. It gives a (+1) situation modifier to any actions that would benefit from a knowledge of the mind and behavior.

Spy Skills
Charm

Your character is charismatic and can sometimes get by on just a smile. She gets a (+1) bonus when trying to get her way in social situations.

Connoisseur

Your character knows his luxury goods, from high fashion to art to gourmet food to jewelry, and gets a (+1) bonus when trying to appraise the true value of an item, identify its origin, and detect imitations.

Detective

A character with this skill has the ability to analyze clues, to detect things that seem out of place, and to think like a criminal; and gets a (+1) bonus when trying to do so.

Escape Artist

A character with this skill knows about manacles, cuffs, knots, and other types of bindings. She gets a (+1) bonus when trying to escape from them.

Forgery

This skill gives your character the ability to make forged documents, and gives him a (+1) bonus to detect forgeries.

Intimidation

A character with this not-very-heroic skill can create a powerful intimidating presence, and knows how to take advantage of it, giving her a (+1) bonus in social situations when she tries to get her way through intimidation.

Lockpicking

A character with this skill knows how to pop open locks (even electronic ones, if they exist in his era), and gets a (+1) bonus when trying to do so.

Negotiation

Characters with this skill know how drive a hard bargain and make a persuasive argument, and get a (+1) bonus in social situations that would benefit from those abilities.

Slight Of Hand

Your character knows the art of misdirection, and can use it for everything from performing magicians’ parlor tricks to picking pockets, getting a (+1) situation modifier to do so.

Stealth

This skill gives your character the ability to move quietly, without drawing attention or leaving much of a trail. Those trying to detect or follow her movements do so at a (-1) penalty.

Combat Skills
Acrobatics

A character with this skill knows how to avoid getting hit, and gets a (+1) bonus when acting as the defensive character in hand-to-hand or distance combat.

Aerial Combat

Your character knows how to fight well in aerial hand-to-hand combat, and gets a (+1) bonus when fighting while flying without using an actual vehicle (e.g.: wings, levitation, etc…).

Aquatic Combat

A character with this skill knows how to fight hand-to-hand underwater, and ignores the normal penalties for doing so.

Pressure Points 2This skill costs twice as much as other skills.

A character with this skill knows the vulnerable places to hit on a body, and is capable of delivering a knockback, knock out, or critical hit to his opponent in combat, even if he didn’t inflict any damage. This skill costs as much as two skills.

Quickstrike

Your character has fast reflexes in hand-to-hand combat. When determining who goes first, she is treated as if her Perception trait was one level higher.

Unarmed Combat

Your character knows some form of unarmed combat, such as Capoeira, Greco-Roman Wrestling, or Kung Fu, and gets a (+1) bonus when fighting hand-to-hand unarmed.

Zero Gravity Combat

A character with this skill knows how to fight hand-to-hand in a weightless environment, and ignores the normal penalties for doing so.

Weapon Skills
Archery

This skill gives your character the ability use bows, from compound to short to Daiku, and gives him a (+1) bonus when using any type of bow in combat.

Fast Draw

Your character can draw and use a distance weapon quickly. When determining who goes first in distance combat, she is treated as if her Perception trait was one level higher.

Firearms

Your character knows how to use guns, and gets a (+1) bonus when using any type of gun in combat, from a musket to a laser pistol.

Gunnery

This skill gives the ability to aim and fire heavy weapons, from howitzers to cannons, and gives a character a (+1) bonus when using those weapons in combat.

Marksmanship 2This skill costs twice as much as other skills.

A character with this skill ignores all penalties for range in distance combat. This skill costs as much as two skills.

Specialist: 1You must specify an application for this skill; You can buy several different applications of this skill. 2This skill costs twice as much as other skills.

Your character has become a master in the use of one type of weapon, and gets a (+2) bonus when using it in combat. The type of weapon must be specific; Specialist: Rapier instead of Specialist: Sword, or Specialist: Colt .45 instead of Specialist: Gun. If the weapon is unique (e.g.: Specialist: Excalibur), he is treated as if his Perception trait was one level higher when determining who goes first in combat. This skill costs twice as much as other skills.

Weapons Master 2This skill costs twice as much as other skills.

A character with this skill has mastered the principles of hand-to-hand combat with weapons. She gets a (+1) bonus when using any hand-to-hand weapon in combat. This skill costs as much as two skills.

Weapons, Blunt

Your character knows how to make the best use of blunt weapons such as staves, nunchuku, and clubs. He gets a (+1) situation modifier when using those types of weapons in hand-to-hand combat.

Weapons, Sharp

Your character uses weapons with blades and points, such as spears and daggers, to their best effect, and gets a (+1) bonus when using weapons of this type in hand-to-hand combat.

Weapons, Thrown

This skill gives your character the ability to throw weapons with accuracy, from throwing stars to javelins. He also has a better chance than most of catching such weapons without getting hurt. He gets a (+1) situation modifier when trying to use or catch thrown weapons in distance combat.

— Table of Contents —

Power Descriptions

Appendix III

Sense Powers

Sense Powers
Enhanced Hearing

The power to hear better than the average human being. Use this power instead of your character’s Perception trait when attempting to detect something by sound alone. You should determine if this is because your character can hear a greater range of frequencies, pick up sounds from farther away, or both. This power includes an inherent limitation for which you receive no Character Points: those with this power are more sensitive to loud noises, and have a (-1) penalty when defending against sonic attacks.

Enhanced Sight

The power to see better than a typical human being. This power should be used instead of your character’s Perception trait when detecting things by sight. It includes an inherent limitation: your character has a (-1) penalty when defending against light-based attacks, such as flash grenades.

Enhanced Smell

The power to detect things by smell far better than a typical human. Substitute this power for your character’s Perception trait when attempting to detect things by smell. This power has the inherent limitation that your character gets a (-1) penalty when defending against attacks that target smelling or are scent-based. A possible feat for this power is:

  • Track by Scent: at -1 level.
Enhanced Taste

The power to detect things by taste far better than typical humans. This power should be used instead of your character’s Perception trait when attempting to detect things by taste. On the odd chance that some villain thinks one up, this power comes with the inherent limitation that your character gets a (-1) penalty when defending against attacks that assault her sense of taste.

Enhanced Touch

The power to detect things by touch far better than the average human. Substitute this power for your character’s Perception trait when he attempts to detect something by touch alone. This power includes an inherent limitation: your character is more sensitive to pain and gets a (-1) penalty when resisting a knock out or attacks from stun guns, tasers, etc…

IRInfrared Sight

The power to see into the infrared portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. A character with this power can get around on a dark night or underground without penalty, and can sometimes follow someone by the residual heat left in everything they touched, at least until the trail literally goes cold. She can see a extra set of colors that come from the inside of people and some objects.

Night Sight

The power to see in low-light conditions, such as on a moonless night. It has an inherent limitation: characters with this power are more sensitive to bright lights and suffer a (-1) penalty when defending against light-based attacks, such as flash grenades.

Sense Magic

The power to perceive magical energy. A character with this power can detect the presence of magical creatures, sense enchanted items such as magic wands or rings, and can tell if a spell is in effect over a given area. You should decide whether this power works all the time or requires concentration, and whether your character perceives magic through his eyes, his hands, or in some other way. A possible limitation for this power might be that people who are sensitive to magic are more vulnerable to magical attacks, and have a (-1) penalty when defending against them (GoodGood(+1)(10) limitation).

Sense … 3This power must be defined; You can buy several different versions of this power.

The power to sense … something that cannot be detected by any other Sense Power. You must specify the type of object or creature or energy that your character can detect, such as Sense: Radiation, Sense: Elves, or Sense: Methane. If you decide that your character can detect something that is difficult to define, such as “evil” or “demons”, make sure that it can at least be defined in the rules of this game. For example, Sense: Evil could detect anyone with the Evil Reputation trait, and Sense: Demons could detect any creature from another dimension with the Evil Reputation trait.

Mental Powers
Empathy

The power to sense emotions in other living creatures. The creatures being sensed may not even realize this power is being used on them, unless you decide it has some noticeable side effect. This power is resisted with the Willpower trait.

Illusions

The power to make others see (and perhaps hear and smell) things that are not really there. You should decide whether this power works by bending light (and generating sound, etc…), in which case it can be disrupted by other powers that affect light or wind; or whether it works directly on minds, in which case it would be useless on things without minds, such as robots. Most creatures presented with an illusion, who have no reason to expect one, will accept it at face value until they are confronted with something that doesn’t fit what they already know. A suspected illusion can be resisted with the Perception trait for light / sound / smell based illusions and with the Willpower trait for mental illusions. Even if an illusion is exposed for what it really is, it doesn’t go away until whoever or whatever is generating it is stopped.

Magic 4This power costs twice as much as other powers.

The power to reshape the universe according to one’s will by using energies that do not follow the commonly understood principles of physics; the art and science of casting spells. This power costs twice as much as other powers. You must decide three things for a character with this power:

I. What magical Path does she follow? Her chosen path may give penalties for casting certain spells and bonuses for others, and may require her to follow a particular magical code of honor. You might want to use something other than a name used in the real world for her path (e.g.: Santeria, Rule of St Benedict, The Golden Dawn) to avoid annoying or offending fellow players. A fictional Path could be something like:

Path of the Great Bear Healer

  • (+2) bonus when casting healing spells.
  • (+1) bonus when casting protective spells.
  • (-1) penalty when casting spells while on poisoned, polluted, irradiated, or contaminated ground.
  • Turning away someone who needs healing, even an enemy, is a major crime.
  • Killing a bear outside of a special ceremonial hunt, or not using every piece of that kill, is a dishonorable act.

Path of the Faerie Friend

  • (+1) bonus when casting illusion spells.
  • (+1) bonus when casting mind-control spells.
  • (+1) bonus when casting spells in “charmed” places, such as faerie rings and faerie mounds.
  • (+1) bonus when casting spells within 24 hours before and after an equinox or solstice.
  • (-2) penalty when casting within DrDreadful(-3)(1) range of iron.
  • (-4) penalty when casting spells while touching iron.

Path of the Winter Wizards

  • (+1) bonus when casting cold spells.
  • (+1) bonus when casting in WkWeak(-2)(2) or greater cold weather.
  • (+1) bonus when dealing with legendary creatures of cold (Yeti, Wendigo, Pomola, etc…).
  • (-1) penalty when defending against fire spells.
  • (-1) penalty when casting in PrPoor(-1)(4) or greater hot weather.
  • (-1) penalty when dealing with legendary creatures of fire (Culebre, Smaj, Will-o-wisp, etc…).

II. What Spells does he know? Your character can know a number of spells equal to the value of his Magic power. Each costs as much as a feat and is essentially another one of the powers from this appendix. Each spell has the same level as a character’s Magic power, and can be cast as often as he likes. A spell’s duration varies with its level, as seen in Table 33: Spell Durations. Casting a spell requires a successful Willpower check, unless the character is casting a spell on someone else. Then it becomes a contest vs. the target’s Willpower. A result of GoodGood(+1)(10) level or better means the spell worked; a OutstandingOutstanding(+3)(20) result level means it works at one level higher in power and duration. A CommonCommon(0)(6) or worse result means it fails; a DreadfulDreadful(-3)(1) result level means your character suffers a spell backlash, whose effects vary with the source of his power, as explained next.

III. What are the Sources of her power? You must decide if all your character’s spells are powered the same way, or if different ones use different sources. Her Path may restrict her choice of sources. Four sources are known to magicians:

The Source Within. Your character’s own mind / body are the source of his power. Casting any spell costs one Health Point, plus another Health Point for each turn he maintains it. Spell backlash for this type of spell costs an additional number of Health Points equal to the spell value. These spells can be cast with little or no outward sign that they happened, and can be maintained without effort so long as the point cost is paid every turn. If you character tries to do other things or maintain multiple spells of this type, he must make a successful Willpower check to maintain it all.

The Source Without. Your character acts as a conduit, channelling the ambient magic of the universe into her spells. It comes with no personal cost, unless there is a spell backlash; then she loses one level of Willpower and a number of Health Points equal to the spell value. These spells are cast using sounds and gestures, so if your character is bound or gagged, she has a (-2) penalty while casting spells; if she is both bound and gagged, she cannot cast spells until she breaks free.

The Source Beyond. Your character has a patron in one or more powerful beings that provide the fuel for her spells. Each counts as a regular contact, with the word “spells” listed instead of a level. These spells take one turn per level to cast. A spell backlash forces her to immediately succeed in a Willpower check vs. the spell level, or face a “punishment” from her patron. You might want to use something other than a name used in the real world for her patron (e.g.: Satan, Baron Samedi, Odin, Ganesha, Jesus), to avoid annoying or offending fellow players. A fictional patron could be:

  • Vohlz - It would be unfair to call this entity malevolent, since it does not think in human terms. It almost “eagerly” grants fuel to power spells based on fire, light, and electricity, using any spell backlash as an opportunity to unleash ball lightning and random fires in an area equal to the level of the failed spell.
  • Allura - an entity that sponsors the casting of spells to generate light, heal, and control the weather, it punishes magicians by sending them after those who despoil the natural world.
  • Deep - sponsors spells that control water and weather and allow those not of the sea to survive within it. A spell backlash might turn the magician into a sea creature that can no longer survive outside the ocean.

The Source Purloined. Your character uses the minds / bodies of other living beings to power his spells. Once he touches a living creature that can’t move (a plant, someone bound), he forms a magical connection with them. As long as the connection remains, that creature loses Health Points just as if it were casting the spell itself using The Source Within —it even takes any backlash. The connection breaks when the magician wills it, when the creature dies, or when it gets away. If the creature gets away before the magician releases the connection, he immediately suffers a spell backlash for the last spell cast. A creature with a Willpower trait can resist being turned into a power source if she is conscious when the connection is being made and she succeeds in a contest of her Willpower vs. the magician’s Willpower. Using this source of magic would be considered a crime in just about any story.

Table 33: Spell Durations
Level Duration
DrDreadful(-3)(1) one heartbeat or instant
WkWeak(-2)(2)     1 turn
PrPoor(-1)(4)     10 turns / 1 min
CmCommon(0)(6)     100 turns / 10 min
GdGood(+1)(10)     1 hour
GrGreat(+2)(15)

sunrise to sunset

zenith to nadir

sunset to sunrise

nadir to zenith

or 12 hours
OuOutstanding(+3)(20)

sunrise to sunrise

sunset to sunset

zenith to zenith

nadir to nadir

or 24 hours
ExExtraordinary(+4)(30) one moon or 30 days
PhPhenomenal(+5)(40) one season or 90 days
FaFantastic(+6)(60) a year and a day or 366 days
WoWondrous(+7)(100) until revoked or permanent
Mental Armor

The power to reduce the effect of a mental attack. Both the modifier and value of an oncoming attack are reduced by the modifier and value of this power before they affect your character. For example, if your character has Gr(+2)(15)Great(+2)(15) Mental Armor and he’s subjected to a Ph(+5)(40)Phenomenal(+5)(40) Mental Probe, it’s as if he were hit by a mental probe with a (+4) dice roll modifier and a point value of 35, instead of the full onslaught. One possible feat from this power is:

  • Extended Mental Armor: extend this power’s protection to selected people within range, reducing the level of this power by one level for every extra person protected.
Mental Control

The power to make others do your character’s will. If your character also has the power of Telepathy, she can send suggestions directly to her target’s minds, otherwise, she has to talk to them in a language they understand. This power works by convincing the targets that what your character wants them to do is really what they want to do. People will do just about anything short of knowingly hurting themselves, so long as your character phrases her suggestions in just the right way. This power works full-strength on one person at a time, but can work on more. For every extra person your character attempts to control, this power is reduced by one level. This power is resisted with the Willpower trait.

Mental Probe

The power to sift through other people’s memories. Note that doing this to an unwilling person would be considered a crime in just about every heroic story imaginable. This power works by touch, unless your character also has the power of Telepathy, in which case the range is DreadfulDreadful(-3)(1) (20 m). A person targeted by this power is always aware, if only subconsciously, that they are being probed, and can resist it with his Willpower trait. A person who fails to resist a probing will answer any question put to him, to the best of his understanding, and may even recall things he does not consciously remember experiencing.

Precognition

The power to see the most probable future. You should choose whether your character can see the future of anything she touches when she uses this power, or whether she sees hints to her own future whenever she goes to sleep or meditates. Every time your character tries to use this power, the GMGame Master will secretly make a Precognition check for your character and not reveal the result level. A better result equals a better, more useful hint. Even a DreadfulDreadful(-3)(1) result shows something in the future, just nothing helpful. The GMGame Master will never say something like, “Diamond Jim will shoot your friend Red Dog in the heart, tomorrow at noon”. Instead he might say, “You keep seeing your friend Red Dog, lying completely still, fully dressed except for his missing shoes, with a card, the ace of diamonds, over his heart, while far away, a clock strikes noon”. It would be up to your character to realize that Red Dog’s family buries it’s dead without shoes, and to put all the hints together when she sees a man, with an ace of diamonds tattoo on his hand, reach for his gun while a nearby clock tower starts chiming the hour at noon.

Postcognition

The power to see the events that occurred in an object’s past. The range of this power is always direct touch. When using this power, your character must think of the general time frame she wants to relive, and make an check using this power’s modifier. Touching the walls of a room might reveal everyone who walked through it, but handling a gun might only show the hands that loaded and fired it, while holding a cigarette might show the face that touched it.

Protection from Magic

The power to reduce the effects of a magical attack. Both the modifier and value of an oncoming attack are reduced by the modifier and value of this power before they affect your character. For example, if your character has Ou(+3)(20)Outstanding(+3)(20) Protection from Magic and he’s subjected to a spell that imitates the power Project Fire / Heat at Fa(+6)(60)Fantastic(+6)(60) level, it’s as if he were hit by a flames with a (+3) dice roll modifier and a point value of 55. So instead of losing 75 Health Points, he only loses 55.

Telekinesis

The power to move objects with one’s mind. Any object in range can be held, moved, thrown, or broken with a Strength equal to the level of this power. This power can also be used to make blunt or sharp distance attacks that are aimed using a Willpower check vs. the opponent’s Agility trait.

Telepathy

The power to communicate mind-to-mind with another; the power read the surface thoughts of others and send them mental messages. Someone who doesn’t want your character in her head can resist this power using her Willpower trait. Possible feats for this power include:

  • Mental Armor: at -1 level.
  • Mental Control: at -2 levels.
  • Mental Probe: at -2 levels.
  • Mental Blast: Telepathically stun another mind for SRSimple Roll turns. This feat works at one level lower than this power and is resisted with the Willpower trait.
  • Mental Overload: Overwhelm another mind until your opponent passes out for SRSimple Rollx10 turns. This feat works at one level lower than this power and is resisted with the Willpower trait.
Physical Powers
Adapted to Water

The power to withstand the lack of air, the extreme pressure, and the cold found underwater. A possible limitation for this power might be the inability to survive outside of water without special equipment (PhenomenalPhenomenal(+5)(40) limitation).

Adapted to Vacuum

The power to withstand the lack of air, lack of pressure, and the temperature extremes found in outer space.

Alternate Form

The power to assume a different physical form. Changing forms is an action that takes one turn. This power may be purchased multiple times, each time for another alternate form. The cost in Character Points of all the traits, including powers, for each alternate form is ignored if it is equal to or less than the cost of the original form. Anything above that needs to be purchased separately (so make your character’s most powerful form his original form). Possible feats include:

  • “Instant” Transformation: Transforming is an action like any other, which could be done while moving at half speed, or as part of Multiple Attacks.
  • Partial Transformation: Your character can change just parts of her body from that of one form to another.
Armor

The power to block the effects of a physical attack. Both the modifier and value of an oncoming attack are reduced by the modifier and value of this power before they affect your character. For example, if your character has Gd(+1)(10)Good(+1)(10) Armor, like that from a modern-day “bullet-proof” vest, and he gets hit with a Gr(+2)(15)Great(+2)(15) bullet from a mid-twentieth century Soviet AK-47 automatic rifle, it’s as if he were hit by an attack with a (0) dice roll modifier and a point value of 5. So instead of losing 15 Health Points, he only loses 5. A possible limitation for this power might be that it could function at -2 levels —or not work at all— against one particular type of attack, such as silver weapons (OutstandingOutstanding(+3)(20) limitation).

Blunt Attack

The power to make an attack that counts as a hand-to-hand combat attack from a blunt weapon (on Table 28: Combat Consequences). This can come from having anything from iron-hard fists, to the horns of a ram, to the tail of an ankylosaurus. The value of this power equals the amount of damage it causes.

Chameleon

The power to blend into the colors and patterns of the surrounding area, becoming more difficult to spot. If a character with this power stays still, and no one has a reason to look for her in the first place, she won’t be noticed. Someone deliberately looking for this character can resist this power with his Perception trait. Complicated backgrounds reduce this power by one level, and moving reduces it by two levels. One limitation could be that it only works against a particular background such as snow or shadows (GreatGreat(+2)(15) limitation). Possible feats include:

  • Texture Chameleon: Match textures as well as colors, giving opponents a (-1) penalty to detect your character.
  • IR Chameleon: Match surface temperatures.
  • Color Clash: Change colors in such a quick, disorienting pattern of pulses that it stuns onlookers for SRSimple Roll turns. This feat operates at three levels lower than this power, and can be resisted with the Willpower trait.
Control Phase

The power to “step out of phase” with the rest of the world and become intangible while still visible. In this state, your character is immune to all physical attacks (but could still be affected by mental attacks) and can walk through a solid object, leaving both unharmed. Unless your character has another power to help her avoid breathing, this power can only be used as long as she can hold her breath; on passing out she comes “back into phase” with this world. A character caught inside a solid object will find herself violently repulsed out of it, lose Health Points equal to the Material trait value of the object, and will automatically take a critical hit (see Table 28: Combat Consequences). A possible limitation for this power would be the inability to pass through one material, such as plastic or glass (OutstandingOutstanding(+3)(20) limitation). Possible feats include:

  • Phase others: as long as that person or object is held.
  • Permanent phase: Phased objects stay phased when let go, until they are touched again.
  • Ghost form: Turn translucent or transparent.
Control Size

The power to either grow larger, become smaller, or both. The size change takes one turn to complete. This power cannot be purchased at DreadfulDreadful(-3)(1) level; your character must purchase it at WeakWeak(-2)(2) level or better to get any benefit from it. The sizes to which your character can grow or shrink are listed in Table 27: Size / Volume. At CommonCommon(0)(6) level and lower, the main benefit of this power is reaching up to higher places when larger and fitting into tighter spaces when smaller. When your character can grow to GoodGood(+1)(10) level and higher, he gets a Strength Boost (see It’s You, Only Better, in the Gear section) equal to this power’s level. When your character can shrink to GoodGood(+1)(10) level or lower, the opposite happens: His Strength trait is reduced by a number of levels equal to this power’s modifier. At different sizes beyond CommonCommon(0)(6), he becomes a more difficult target to hit (or miss); the situation modifiers for his opponents are listed in Table 15: Example Situation Modifiers. Possible feats for this power include:

  • Proportional Strength: Instead of being reduced, your character’s Strength is increased when she shrinks, by a Strength Boost equal to this power’s level.
  • Increased Endurance: Your character’s Endurance trait is increased when his Strength is increased.
  • Increased Health Points: When your character grows and her Strength increases, her Health Points go up accordingly. If she takes more damage at her enlarged size than she has Health Points at her original size, she cannot change back to her original size without automatically passing out for SRSimple Rollx10 turns and waking up with one Health Point.
  • “Instant” Grow / Shrink: growing or shrinking is an action like any other, which could be done while moving at half speed, or as part of Multiple Attacks.
Corrosive Attack

The power to generate a corrosive chemical that eats away at whatever it contacts. This could be anything from a disintegrating touch to acidic spit. This power is resisted with the Material trait; a failed result level (or lack of a Material trait) means the target takes damage equal to this power’s value.

Entangling Attack

The power to launch an attack that entangles an opponent. Your character’s opponent could get entangled in anything from a special whip, to epoxy, to giant spider webs, to a science fiction “force field”. This is considered a distance attack, but once an opponent is caught, he resists this power with his Strength trait, and escaping from this attack is treated as if escaping from a hold in hand-to-hand combat.

Extra Attacks

The power to make one extra set of attacks per turn. This could be due to having unusual speed or extra limbs. This power can be purchased multiple times, each time giving your character one more set of attacks. With each set of attacks, your character can also try to make multiple attacks. Extra attacks happen after every other character has made her attack for the turn.

Heal 4This power costs twice as much as other powers.

The power to repair the injuries and illnesses of others. This power only works by direct touch. Any injured person touched by your character recovers a number of Health Points equal to this power’s value, up to her original number of Health Points. She will also recover one lost level in any trait. Recovered Health Points come back at the rate of one per turn, and a lost level comes back in an hour. Your character’s touch can also cure diseases; they can be resisted with this power. Magical curses manifesting as diseases, such as (the legendary version of) lycanthropy and vampirism, cannot be cured with this power. Your character can only heal the same person once in the same day, unless he takes on the following limitation: he takes on what he heals, recovering from it in one quarter the usual time (FantasticFantastic(+6)(60) limitation). This power costs twice as much as other powers.

Immortality 4This power costs twice as much as other powers.

The power to not die. When a character with this power would otherwise die, she simply loses all her unused Character Points while her body regenerates (or she forms a new one). The time it takes your character to recover from an otherwise mortal wound is left up to you, but it should take at least one day. This power costs twice as much other powers, and always comes with an inherent limitation for which you receive no Character Points. Possible limitations could be: having this power fail for a wound to the ankle, or fail for wounds from mistletoe, or requiring some sort of yearly maintenance.

Invisibility

The power to not be seen (and perhaps not heard or smelled). This power could be based on bending light and sound, in which case it could be disrupted by anything that also affects those energies, or it could be based on convincing people that they do not see your character, in which case this power would be useless on robots and other mindless things. One possible feat could be:

  • Make others invisible: only while they are being touched.
Mimic

The power to look (and perhaps sound and smell) like another person. Your character must first get within DreadfulDreadful(-3)(1) range (20 m) of his target for his body to pick up enough information to mimic her. Depending on how this power works, your character’s body could be ready for most modern-day identity tests, such as fingerprinting, retinal scans, and voice analysis. If the power comes from magic, he could even give a believable DNA sample … that would revert to normal after the magic fades. Anyone trying to see past the deception can resist this power with her Perception trait.

Poison Attack

The power to poison an opponent. You must decide whether your character sprays it or passes it by touch. If he also has an sharp attack, the poison could be injected into an opponent. The potency of the poison equals the level of this power.

Protection from Corrosives

The power to reduce the effects of a corrosive attack. Both the modifier and value of an oncoming attack are reduced by the modifier and value of this power before they affect your character. For example, if your character has Ex(+4)(30)Extraordinary(+4)(30) Protection from Corrosives, due to a modern-day HAZMAT suit, and she gets splashed with Ph(+5)(40)Phenomenal(+5)(40) concentrated acid, it’s as if she were hit by an attack with a (+1) dice roll modifier and a point value of 20. So instead of losing 50 Health Points, she only loses 20. A possible limitation for this power would be that it can only protect against certain corrosives, such as only acids or only bases (PhenomenalPhenomenal(+5)(40) limitation).

Protection from Disease

The power to reduce the effects of a disease that attacks your character’s body. Both the modifier and value of the disease are reduced by the modifier and value of this power before they affect your character. For example, if your character has Ex(+4)(30)Extraordinary(+4)(30) Protection from Disease and he’s exposed to a vial of Ph(+5)(40)Phenomenal(+5)(40) genetically engineered antibiotic-resistant microorganisms, it’s as if the disease they spread has a (+1) dice roll modifier and a point value of 20.

Protection from Poison

The power to reduce the effects of a poison attack. Both the modifier and value of the poison are reduced by the modifier and value of this power before they affect your character. For example, if your character has Ou(+3)(20)Outstanding(+3)(20) Protection from Poison and she’s bitten by a creature with a Fa(+6)(60)Fantastic(+6)(60) poisonous bite, it’s as if the poison had a (+3) dice roll modifier and a point value of 55 (the bite itself is another matter).

Protection from Physical Attacks

The power to reduce the effects of a physical attack. Unlike with the Armor power, the attack penetrates (as will any side effect, such as a poison), but it just doesn’t do as much damage. A portion of it is shaken off or heals so quickly that it isn’t noticed. Both the modifier and value of the attack are reduced by the modifier and value of this power before they affect your character. For example, if your character has Gd(+1)(10)Good(+1)(10) Protection from Physical Attacks and he’s bitten by a creature with a Gr(+2)(15)Great(+2)(15) bite, it’s as if the attack had a (+1) dice roll modifier and a point value of 5, so he’d only lose 5 Health Points. Even if your character takes no damage from the attack, he may still need to deal with any side effects, such as the sleep drug in a needle or the poison on a blade.

Regenerate

The power to heal faster than normal. A character with this power heals a number Health Points every 10 turns equal to the value of this power, plus one level of any one trait per hour. Note that just as with normal healing, your character must be at complete rest —no traveling, no research, no action— for this power to work.

Self-Sufficiency

The power to survive without food, water, air, etc… for a number of days equal to the value of this power. A possible limitation could be that this power must be maintained by occasional exposure to sunlight or some specialized fuel, either constantly (ExtraordinaryExtraordinary(+4)(30) limitation), or at the end of a number of days equal to this power’s value (GoodGood(+1)(10) limitation).

Shapeshift

The power to change shape into other creatures. Your character automatically gets the use of any of a creature’s Sense Powers except for Sense Magic, and any of the creature’s Physical Powers except for Alternate Form, Control Phase, Control Size, Invisibility, Immortality, Mimic, and Shapeshift. Her Brawling, Agility, Strength, Endurance, and Perception traits, along with the levels of the creature’s powers, become those typical for the creature, unless they are greater than the level of this power, in which case they default to this power’s level. If your character takes more damage in another form than she has Health Points in her original form, she cannot change back to her original form without automatically passing out for SRSimple Rollx10 turns and waking up with one Health Point.

Sharp Attack

The power to make an attack that counts as a hand-to-hand combat attack from a sharp weapon (on Table 28: Combat Consequences). This can be from having claws, spikes, spurs, spines, horns, quills, a beak, or some other pointy body part. This power’s value equals the amount of damage it causes.

Vampirism

The power to drain away a person’s life energy to feed and fuel oneself. This power only works by direct touch. You must decide how your character uses this power: by touch alone, or by consuming some part of his target, such as blood. You must also decide what he takes from his target: either a number of Health Points equal to this power’s value, or a level of the Agility, Strength, Endurance, Intelligence, or Willpower trait. Stolen Health Points are added to his own Health Points, and can temporarily raise them up to twice their normal amount. These extra points are used up first, and in any event, disappear after an hour. Stolen levels of traits can be used to regain lost levels in any trait, and to temporarily raise either Agility, Strength, Endurance, Intelligence, or Willpower by one level for an hour. One possible limitation to this power would be that your character would only be able to heal and feed by draining others (ExtraordinaryExtraordinary(+4)(30) limitation). Another possible limitation would be that on being reduced to 5 Health Points or less, your character acts as if he has the mental limitation Addiction (at GreatGreat(+2)(15), OutstandingOutstanding(+3)(20), or ExtraordinaryExtraordinary(+4)(30) level) for draining people.

Transport Powers
Climb

The power to climb along walls, and perhaps even ceilings. You must decide whether your character does this by means of suction cups, gecko-like pads, magic, or something else. This power’s level opposes the Slipperiness of whatever surface your character is trying to climb.

Fly

The power to move though the sky. You must decide how your character does this: by some sort of levitation, through a pair of insect- or bird-like wings, or through control of the winds themselves, as each type of flight comes with its own side effects. This power’s level equals the Speed level at which your character can move.

FTLFaster Than Light Travel

The power to travel faster than the speed of light. Someone or something with this power can travel ten times the speed of light times this power’s value. A possible FantasticFantastic(+6)(60) limitation for this power would be that it only works in zero gravity.

Interdimensional Travel

The power to move from this dimension to other dimensions. This power’s value is the number of places to which your character can travel, and the number of people she can bring along with her. A possible limitation for this power could be that it works by creating a separate portal that stays open for a few turns after your character goes through, and in that time could allow just about anything to pass between two worlds (OutstandingOutstanding(+3)(20) limitation). Another limitation could be that it only works through an actual door, or through mirrors, or pools of water (OutstandingOutstanding(+3)(20) limitation).

Jump

The power to jump farther than normal. The distance that can be jumped is equal to the range for this power’s level.

Speed

The power to move faster than normal. The level of Speed is equal to the level of this power. One possible feat would be:

  • Acceleration: Instead of increasing speed by one level per turn, a character with this feat can increase his speed every turn by the number of levels he has of Speed.
Teleport

The power to move from one place to another without crossing the space in between. A character with this power can bring along as much extra weight as she can carry. It is assumed that your character has adapted to the shock of suddenly finding herself in a place with a different temperature, air pressure, and rotational speed on the planet, but anyone she brings along must make an Endurance check vs. the level of the range traveled, or be stunned for SRSimple Roll turns on arrival.

Matter & Energy Control Powers
Body of Earth

The power to either be sheathed in a layer of some sort of earth, or to transform into a living, mobile, creature of earth. You should choose whether or not your character transforms into a specific form of earth, such as granite or shale. The Material trait of this earth equals the power’s level, and the damage your character inflicts in hand-to-hand combat equals this power’s value. Possible feats include:

  • Control Earth: at -2 levels.
  • Move through Earth: as if swimming through water.
  • Shake the Earth: Create minor tremors at -1 level.
Body of Electricity

The power to either be sheathed in a layer of electricity, or to transform into a living, mobile, creature of electricity. Your character can travel through conductive material at a Speed equal to this power’s level, and inflict damage on contact equal to the value of this power. Possible feats include:

Body of Fire

The power to either be sheathed in a layer of fire, or to transform into a living, mobile, creature of fire. Your character can inflict damage on contact equal to this power’s value. Possible feats for this power include:

Body of Ice

The power to either be sheathed in a layer of ice, or to transform into a living, mobile, creature of ice. Your character only has the Material trait of ice, DreadfulDreadful(-3)(1), but inflicts damage on contact equal to this power’s value. Possible feats include:

  • Control Temperature: at -2 levels.
  • Project Cold / Ice: at -1 level.
  • Speed: Slide across flat surfaces at a Speed equal to three levels lower than this power, by making skates from a constantly regenerating coating of melting ice.
Body of Light

The power to either be sheathed in a layer of concentrated light energy, or to transform into a living, mobile, creature of pure light. Your character can change the intensity of his light from a soft glow to a sudden, blinding flash equal to the level of this power. Possible feats for this power include:

Body of Negative Energy

The power to either be sheathed in a layer of negative energy, or to transform into a living, mobile, creature of this negative energy. You must decide whether this energy behaves according to the speculations on “dark energy”, or if it simply acts as a sort of energy sponge, sucking the heat and power out of everything it touches, at this power’s level. Possible feats for this power would be:

Body of Sound

The power to either be sheathed in a layer of concentrated sound energy, or to transform into a living, mobile, creature of pure sonic vibrations. Your character can change the intensity of her vibrations from a soft hum to a sudden, deafening roar equal to this power’s level. Possible feats include:

Body of Water

The power to either be sheathed in a layer of some sort of liquid, or to transform into a living, mobile, creature of liquid. You should choose whether or not your character transforms into a specific type of liquid, such as water or oil. This liquid has the power to entangle a person with a Strength equal to this power’s level, while at the same time cutting off the air of anyone it entangles.

Body of Wind

The power to either be sheathed in an ever-moving layer of gas or to transform into a living, mobile, creature of gas. You should decide whether your character transforms into a specific type of gas, such as air, smoke, or water vapor. The gas moves fast enough to partially deflect distance attacks from physical weapons, such as bullets and arrows, reducing such attacks by this power’s value. It also gives Fly at one level lower than this power’s level. If your character is made of gas, he can fit through any opening that isn’t air-tight.

Body of … 3This power must be defined; You can buy several different versions of this power.

The power to either be covered by, or transform into, something not available through any other Body power. The GMGame Master will determine the exact nature of this power depending on what material or energy you choose, but in general, it may provide the equivalent of Armor or Resistance to Physical Attacks at a level equal to this power’s level.

Control Earth

The power to reshape earth and rock. You may also choose to have your character only control one specific type of earth, such as sand or magma. The range of this power is also the amount of earth that can be reshaped. For example, a character with this power at Common(0)(6) level can manipulate 12 m3 of rock and earth from 120 m away.

Control Electricity

The power to manipulate electrical energy. Your character can disrupt or damage any electrical gear in range. Given an electrical source, she can build barriers of electric arcs, and even create semi-autonomous energy creatures with no Willpower trait, PoorPoor(-1)(4) Perception and Intelligence traits, and Brawling, Agility, Strength, and Endurance traits all equal to this power’s level. Possible feats for this power include:

Control Fire

The power to reshape fire. Your character can decrease the level of any fire in range by the level of this power, or grow any fire up to this power’s level. Given a source of fire, he can build walls of fire, and make semi-autonomous creatures of flame with no Willpower trait, PoorPoor(-1)(4) Perception and Intelligence traits, and Brawling, Agility, Strength, and Endurance traits all equal to this power’s level. Possible feats include:

Control Light

The power to manipulate light energy. Your character can decrease the level of any light source in range by the level of this power, or increase any light source up to this power’s level; she can even do it very quickly to generate a stunning flash equal to this power’s level. She can also shift the frequency of any light, and blur the light around her so opponents suffer a (-1) penalty when trying to target her. Possible feats include:

Control Magnetism

The power to manipulate magnetic fields. Your character can disrupt or damage any electrical or magnetic gear in range. He can decrease any magnetic field in range by the level of this power, or increase it up to this power’s level. He can also move iron-rich objects as if he had Telekinesis. One possible feat is:

Control Negative Energy

The power to manipulate negative energy, however you decide it works in your story. Given a source of negative energy, your character can shape it into barriers, and make semi-autonomous creatures of negative energy with no Willpower trait, PoorPoor(-1)(4) Perception and Intelligence traits, and Brawling, Agility, Strength, and Endurance traits all equal to this power’s level. Possible feats for this power include:

Control Shadow

The power to reshape shadows. As long as some object within range is casting a natural shadow, your character can make it grow, shrink, and take on different shapes, all in complete contradiction to the commonly understood rules of optics. She can hide himself in this shadow; if she stays still, and no one has a reason to look for her, she won’t be noticed. Someone deliberately looking for her can resist this power with his Perception trait.

Control Sound

The power to manipulate sound. Your character can decrease the level of any sounds in range by the level of this power, or increase any sound up to this power’s level; she can even do it suddenly to create a stunning effect equal to this power’s level. Given an audio source, she can make semi-solid and semi-autonomous creatures of sonic vibrations with no Willpower trait, PoorPoor(-1)(4) Perception and Intelligence traits, and Brawling, Agility, Strength, and Endurance traits all equal to the level of this power. Possible feats include:

Control Temperature

The power to manipulate the temperature. Your character can increase or decrease the temperature felt within range of this power to a level equal to this power’s level. The exact effects vary with the surroundings: a lake could freeze over or a steam engine could rupture. It also automatically gives protection from both heat and cold equal to this power’s level.

Control Water

The power to reshape liquids. You must decide whether your character can affect all liquids or only one in particular, such as water or oil. He can use this power to form air bubbles and tunnels in liquids. The range of this power is also the amount of liquid that can be reshaped. For example, a character with this power at Common(0)(6) level can reshape liquids from 120 m away, and can reshape 12 m3 of liquid.

Control Weather

The power to manipulate the weather. Any weather effect can be decreased by the level of this power or increased up to this power’s level. Possible feats for this power include:

  • Call Down Lightning: Similar to Project Electricity, except it comes from the sky, at -1 level.
  • Call Down Hail: Inflicting damage at -1 level.
  • Control Wind: at -1 level.
  • Call Fog / Mist: at -1 level.
Control Wind

The power to manipulate the wind. Any wind can be decreased by the level of this power or increased up to this power’s level. Your character can change its direction and create sudden drafts to push and knock around objects with a Strength equal to this power’s level. One possible feat is:

  • Fly: at a level equal to this power.
Control … 3This power must be defined; You can buy several different versions of this power.

The power to control something not covered by any other Control power. You must specify what your character can control, so the GMGame Master can determine the exact nature of this power. In general, your character can reduce the effects of an attack based on this material of energy. If she controls something physical, she can usually reshape it into any form she can imagine; if she controls a form of energy, she can reduce its effects by the level of this power or increase it up to this power’s level.

Project Cold / Ice

The power to shoot either waves of cold or missiles made of ice and snow as a distance attack. This attack inflicts damage equal to this power’s value. Possible feats include:

  • Body of Ice: at -1 level.
  • Ice trap: Encase a target in a block of ice.
Project Electricity

The power to shoot arcs or balls of electricity as a distance attack, inflicting damage equal to this power’s value. Possible feats for this power include:

Project Fire / Heat

The power to shoot either waves of heat or jets and missiles made of fire as a distance attack. This attack inflicts damage equal to this power’s value. Possible feats include:

Project Light

The power to shoot beams of concentrated light as a distance attack, inflicting damage equal to this power’s value. Possible feats for this power include:

Project Negative Energy

The power to shoot beams or missiles of negative energy, inflicting damage equal to this power’s value. Possible feats for this power include:

Project Sound

The power to shoot waves of sonic vibrations as a distance attack, inflicting damage equal to this power’s value. Possible feats include:

Project … 3This power must be defined; You can buy several different versions of this power.

The power to create a distance attack from something that isn’t covered by any of the other Project powers. This attack inflicts damage equal to this power’s value, and the GMGame Master may determine that it has other side effects as well.

Protection from Cold

The power to reduce the effects of attacks based on cold. Both the modifier and value of the attack are reduced by the modifier and value of this power before they affect your character. For example, if your character has Gd(+1)(10)Good(+1)(10) Protection from Cold and he’s blasted with some sort of Ex(+4)(30)Extraordinary(+4)(30) science fiction “cold ray”, it’s as if the attack had a (+3) dice roll modifier and a point value of 20. So instead of losing 30 Health Points, he only loses 20. A character with this power can also ignore extremely cold temperatures equal to or less than this power’s level.

Protection from Electricity

The power to reduce the effects of attacks based on electricity. Both the modifier and value of the attack are reduced by the modifier and value of this power before they affect your character. For example, if your character has Gr(+2)(15)Great(+2)(15) Protection from Electricity and she’s hit with a Ph(+5)(40)Phenomenal(+5)(40) lightning bolt, it’s as if the attack had a (+3) dice roll modifier and a point value of 35. Instead of losing 50 Health Points, she only loses 35.

Protection from Energy Attacks

The power to reduce the effects of attacks based either entirely or mostly on energy, such as laser beams, science fiction plasma weapons, and flamethrowers. Both the modifier and value of the attack are reduced by the modifier and value of this power before they affect your character. For example, if your character has Ou(+3)(20)Outstanding(+3)(20) Protection from Energy Attacks and he’s hit with a Ph(+5)(40)Phenomenal(+5)(40) energy bolt, it’s as if the attack had a (+2) dice roll modifier and a point value of 30. So instead of losing 50 Health Points, he only loses 30.

Protection from Fire

The power to reduce the effects of attacks based on fire. Both the modifier and value of the attack are reduced by the modifier and value of this power before they affect your character. For example, if your character has Ou(+3)(20)Outstanding(+3)(20) Protection from Fire and she’s hit with a Ex(+4)(30)Extraordinary(+4)(30) fireball, it’s as if the attack had a (+1) dice roll modifier and a point value of 10. So instead of losing 30 Health Points, she only loses 10.

Protection from Light

The power to reduce the effects of attacks based on light. Both the modifier and value of the attack are reduced by the modifier and value of this power before they affect your character. For example, if your character has Gd(+1)(10)Good(+1)(10) Protection from Light and he’s exposed to a Ou(+3)(20)Outstanding(+3)(20) level blinding flash, it’s as if the flash had a (+2) dice roll modifier and a point value of 10.

Protection from Negative Energy

The power to reduce the effects of attacks based on negative energy, whatever the GMGame Master decides that is in your game. Both the modifier and value of the attack are reduced by the modifier and value of this power before they affect your character. For example, if your character has Gr(+2)(15)Great(+2)(15) Protection from Negative Energy and she’s exposed to a Ex(+4)(30)Extraordinary(+4)(30) negative energy field, it’s as if the field had a (+2) dice roll modifier and a point value of 15.

Protection from Sound

The power to reduce the effects of attacks based on sonic vibrations. Both the modifier and value of the attack are reduced by the modifier and value of this power before they affect your character. For example, if your character has Ou(+3)(20)Outstanding(+3)(20) Protection from Sound and he’s hit with a Fa(+6)(60)Fantastic(+6)(60) sonic wave, it’s as if the attack had a (+3) dice roll modifier and a point value of 55. So instead of losing 75 Health Points, he only loses 55.

Protection from … 3This power must be defined; You can buy several different versions of this power.

The power to reduce the effects of attacks based on … something not covered by any of the other Protection powers. You must choose what it is that doesn’t hurt your character as much as it hurts others. Both the modifier and value of the attack are reduced by the modifier and value of this power before they affect your character.

— Table of Contents —

Limitation Descriptions

Appendix IV

A limitation can be just about anything that makes life more difficult for your character, and often makes for a more interesting story. Every limitation has a level: the more restrictive the limitation, the higher its level. Taking on a limitation earns your character a number of Character Points equal to the value of the level of that limitation. If a limitation only affects one, or only some, of a character’s powers, it is only worth half as many points (rounding down).

For example, Detective Behr has an original power, Linguistic Savant, and it has a Good(+1)(10) limitation that applies only to it, so that limitation is only worth (10 ÷ 2 =) 5 Character Points. He also has a Outstanding(+3)(20) Fugitive limitation, that affects him all the time, so it’s worth the full 20 points.

Physical Limitations

Special Limitations

Power Limitations
Side Effect (variable)

Your character’s power comes with a troublesome side effect. Depending on this limitation’s level, it could be:

PrPoor(-1)(4): A power that could otherwise be used with stealth creates all manner of lights / sounds / smells that make it obvious it’s being used, and who’s using it.

GdGood(+1)(10): Once started, it stays on for a number of turns equal to the power’s value.

GdGood(+1)(10): Not always reliable; Requires a GdGood(+1)(10) result on a power check just to see if it works at all.

GrGreat(+2)(15): Unreliable; Requires a GrGreat(+2)(15) result on a power check just to see if it works at all.

OuOutstanding(+3)(20): Extremely unreliable; Requires an OuOutstanding(+3)(20) result on a power check just to see if it works at all.

ExExtraordinary(+4)(30): Every use stuns the character for 1 turn.

PhPhenomenal(+5)(40): Every use stuns the character for SRSimple Roll turns or drains one Health Point.

FaFantastic(+6)(60): Every use drains SRSimple Roll Health Points.

WoWondrous(+7)(100): Each use drains Health Points equal to power’s value.

Limited Number of Uses (variable)

After your character uses her power, she must wait before she can use it again; How long depends on this limitation’s level:

PrPoor(-1)(4): 10 turns / 1 minute

CmCommon(0)(6): 100 turns / 10 minutes

GdGood(+1)(10): 1 hour

GrGreat(+2)(15): 12 hours

OuOutstanding(+3)(20): 24 hours

Condition (variable)

In order for his powers to work, your character must satisfy a certain set of conditions. Alternately, his powers will / won’t work under certain conditions. Examples include:

GrGreat(+2)(15): The power only works at night / day.

GrGreat(+2)(15): The power will not function at some environmental extreme, such as underwater, in outer space, below WkWeak(-2)(2) cold, or above PrPoor(-1)(4) heat.

OuOutstanding(+3)(20): The power is useless against one type of object or creature, such as faerie folk, objects colored red, beings from another dimension, or animals.

ExExtraordinary(+4)(30): The power is useless against a broad category of objects, such as all organic matter.

ExExtraordinary(+4)(30): Requires saying a specific phrase, making a particular gesture, or using a specific item. In the case of an item, it must be something that can be described by at least three distinct characteristics, such as “teardrop-cut two-carat ruby” or “beaded snowy owl’s tail feather”.

PhPhenomenal(+5)(40): Will only work on one specific type of object or creature, such as trolls or cats.

FaFantastic(+6)(60): Will only work in some environmental extreme.

FaFantastic(+6)(60): Requires using a unique item, such as Excalibur.

Physical Limitations
Allergy (variable)

Your character is has a bad reaction to some relatively common substance or energy. Examples include salt, water, sunlight, silver, gold, plastic, sulfur, granite, microwaves, UV light, iron, and wood. If the GMGame Master determines that the substance or energy is too exotic (a specific iridium isotope) this limitation will be one level lower. This limitation can take several forms. One form is for the substance to do damage on contact equal to this limitation’s value. Other variations include:

GdGood(+1)(10): Weapons made from this substance / using this energy inflict +1 level of damage.

GdGood(+1)(10): For every hour that your character stays within DrDreadful(-3)(1) range (20 m), she loses 10 Health Points.

GrGreat(+2)(15): Weapons made from this substance / using this energy inflict +2 level of damage.

GrGreat(+2)(15): For every ten minutes that your character stays within DrDreadful(-3)(1) range (20 m), he loses 15 Health Points.

OuOutstanding(+3)(20): Weapons made from this substance / using this energy inflict +3 levels of damage.

OuOutstanding(+3)(20): For every ten turns that your character stays within DrDreadful(-3)(1) range (20 m), she loses 20 Health Points.

ExExtraordinary(+4)(30): Weapons made from this substance / using this energy inflict +4 levels of damage.

ExExtraordinary(+4)(30): For every turn that your character stays within DrDreadful(-3)(1) range (20 m), he loses 30 Health Points.

PhPhenomenal(+5)(40): Weapons made from this substance / using this energy inflict +5 levels of damage.

FaFantastic(+6)(60): Weapons made from this substance / using this energy inflict +6 levels of damage.

WoWondrous(+7)(100): Weapons made from this substance / using this energy inflict +7 levels of damage.

Blindness (FaFantastic(+6)(60))

Your character cannot see. The GMGame Master will describe everything to you in terms of your character’s other senses. Without some way to compensate, she will have a (-2) penalty for all hand-to-hand and distance combat.

Crippled Legs (PhPhenomenal(+5)(40))

Your character’s legs are both damaged. He requires a wheelchair (see Gear Descriptions) or a similar device to get about.

Deafness (PhPhenomenal(+5)(40))

Your character cannot hear, and the GMGame Master will describe everything to you in terms of your character’s other senses. Without some way to compensate, she will have a (-2) penalty when defending herself in distance combat.

Dependency (variable)

Your character requires some specific substance or set of conditions to live. Deprive him of that substance or change those conditions for more than a short time, and he will start to die. Possible dependencies include:

GrGreat(+2)(15):Your character must take some substance (like insulin shots or nitroglycerine tablets) once per day. Going more than 24 hours without it will cause her to either get faint, have seizures, or have convulsions, giving a (-4) penalty to all her actions. Use the rules for drowning to see how long she stays conscious at this point; once unconscious, she starts dying. This limitation is one level higher if the substance is something exotic.

OuOutstanding(+3)(20): As above, except he requires it three times a day, and he begins suffering after eight hours of deprivation.

ExExtraordinary(+4)(30): As above, except she requires hourly doses to live.

PhPhenomenal(+5)(40): He breathes in water and drowns in air. This limitation is one level higher if he breathes something more exotic, such as methane gas.

Farsightedness (OuOutstanding(+3)(20))

Your character cannot clearly see objects at closer than DrDreadful(-3)(1) range (20 m). Without some kind of corrective lenses, her Perception is considered Wk(-2)(2)Weak(-2)(2) when detecting and reacting to sights, and she has a (-1) penalty in hand-to-hand combat.

Hearing Impairment (OuOutstanding(+3)(20))

Your character cannot clearly make out sounds emanating from beyond DrDreadful(-3)(1) range (20 m). Without some sort of hearing aid, his Perception is considered Wk(-2)(2)Weak(-2)(2) when detecting and reacting to sounds, and he has a (-1) penalty in distance combat when defending against any attack that originates from outside of DreadfulDreadful(-3)(1) range.

Limp (ExExtraordinary(+4)(30))

Your character has some sort of injury in either one or both legs. She is considered to have a Wk(-2)(2)Weak(-2)(2) Strength and Endurance for the purposes of running and jumping.

Muteness (ExExtraordinary(+4)(30))

Your character cannot speak, and can only communicate with other characters through signing and gestures.

Nearsightedness (OuOutstanding(+3)(20))

Your character cannot clearly see objects beyond DrDreadful(-3)(1) range (20 m). Without some kind of corrective lenses, his Perception is considered Wk(-2)(2)Weak(-2)(2) when detecting and reacting to sights, and he has a (-1) penalty in distance combat when defending against attacks that originate from outside of DrDreadful(-3)(1) range.

Night Blindness (OuOutstanding(+3)(20))

Your character operates at night as if she were in total darkness, making distance combat impossible for her and giving her a (-2) penalty for all other actions at night.

No Sense of Smell (OuOutstanding(+3)(20))

Your character cannot smell anything. The GMGame Master will not include smells in any descriptions or clues given to you. This can sometimes prove dangerous (not smelling the gas escaping from a ruptured line before it explodes, not smelling the smoke from a small fire before it blazes out of control, etc…).

No Sense of Touch (ExExtraordinary(+4)(30))

Your character cannot feel anything. The GMGame Master will not include the feel of anything in any descriptions or clues given to you. Additionally, any damage he takes will be described in terms of his other senses, and never given out as an exact number.

Paralysis (WoWondrous(+7)(100))

Your character cannot move at all under her own power, and requires a powered exoskeleton, powered armor (see Gear Descriptions), or a similar device to even get up.

Partial Colorblindness (OuOutstanding(+3)(20))

Your character cannot distinguish between two different colors, like red and green. This could be nothing more than a nuisance or it could become life threatening (wires for explosives are often color-coded).

Sensitive Sense (ExExtraordinary(+4)(30))

Either from past injury or illness, your character’s sight, hearing, or smell is more sensitive to injury than normal. He resists attacks aimed at his injured sense with a (-1) penalty.

Sensitivity (variable)

When within DrDreadful(-3)(1) range (20 m) of a given substance, or when coming into contact with a particular energy, the levels of all your character’s powers drop. Alternately, the levels of his Brawling, Agility, Strength, Endurance, Willpower, Intelligence, and Perception drop. If both her powers and traits drop, she is considered to have taken this limitation twice. As with the Allergy limitation, if the substance or energy isn’t common, this limitation is one level lower. The level of this limitation is tied to on how far the powers or traits drop:

GdGood(+1)(10): -1 level

GrGreat(+2)(15): -2 levels

OuOutstanding(+3)(20): -3 levels

ExExtraordinary(+4)(30): -4 levels

PhPhenomenal(+5)(40): -5 levels

FaFantastic(+6)(60): -6 levels

WoWondrous(+7)(100): -7 levels

Shortwinded (ExExtraordinary(+4)(30))

Your character may be asthmatic, a heavy smoker, or have a damaged lung. He is considered to have a Wk(-2)(2)Weak(-2)(2) Endurance for the purposes of running, holding his breath, or any other prolonged strenuous activity that requires him to check how long he can keep it up.

Mental Limitations
Addiction (variable)

Your character is addicted to some substance, like alcohol. When presented with the chance or excuse to take the substance, she must make a Willpower check vs. the level of this limitation. The minimum result level required to resist her addiction varies with the level of this limitation:

GdGood(+1)(10): Recovering addict, requires a GoodGood(+1)(10) result.

GrGreat(+2)(15): Addiction, requires a GreatGreat(+2)(15) result.

OuOutstanding(+3)(20): Serious addiction, requires an OutstandingOutstanding(+3)(20) result.

Failing to meet the minimum result level means your character stops what she’s doing and seeks out her addiction. This could result in simply sidetracking the character long enough to let down her team or leaving the character completely unable to function, depending on the substance.

Compulsive Behavior or Obsession (variable)

Your character just can’t resist doing something, like being a show-off or having the last word, or he is fascinated with something to the point of distraction. If he is presented with an opportunity to so indulge, convenient or not, he must make a Willpower check vs. the level of this limitation. The minimum result level required to resist his obsession varies with the level of this limitation:

GdGood(+1)(10): Mild compulsive behavior or obsession, requires a GoodGood(+1)(10) result.

GrGreat(+2)(15): Moderate compulsive behavior or obsession, requires a GreatGreat(+2)(15) result.

OuOutstanding(+3)(20): Severe compulsive behavior or obsession, requires an OutstandingOutstanding(+3)(20) result.

Failing to meet the minimum result level means your character will engage in this behavior, regardless of the risks.

Phobia (variable)

Your character fears something, like the dark, close quarters, or heights. When confronting or presented with what she fears, she must make a Willpower check vs. the level of this limitation. The minimum result level required to resist her fear varies with the level of this limitation:

GdGood(+1)(10): Mild phobia, requires a GoodGood(+1)(10) result.

GrGreat(+2)(15): Moderate phobia, requires a GreatGreat(+2)(15) result.

OuOutstanding(+3)(20): Severe phobia, requires an OutstandingOutstanding(+3)(20) result.

Failing to meet the minimum result level means your character will spend the next SRSimple Roll turns unable to act from fear. She may try to oppose this limitation every new turn, with a cumulative (-1) penalty for every turn, until she succeeds or is forced away from what she fears. Even if she succeeds on her very first attempt, your character will have a (-2) penalty (for a GreatGreat(+2)(15) Phobia), a (-4) penalty (for a OutstandingOutstanding(+3)(20) Phobia), or a (-6) penalty (for an ExtraordinaryExtraordinary(+4)(30) Phobia) on all her actions while in the presence of what she fears.

Special Limitations
Fugitive (variable)

Somebody is after your character. It could be an individual, a corporation, a crime syndicate, a government, or something worse. At the beginning of every chapter, the GMGame Master makes a secret check, pitting the level of this limitation against a CommonCommon(0)(6) challenge. The level of this limitation is an indication of the determination and resources of your character’s pursuers. At a DreadfulDreadful(-3)(1) result level, your character’s enemies are either not looking for him right now, or have lost his trail; there will be no encounter with them in this chapter. With a GoodGood(+1)(10) result, they are in the vicinity, but your character gets some advanced warning (sees them, or signs of them, before they see him) and has a chance to avoid them. With a GreatGreat(+2)(15) result, your character and his enemy encounter each other with no advanced warning; both are surprised. With a OutstandingOutstanding(+3)(20) result, your character’s enemies spot him before he is aware of them, and may set up an ambush or trap. Your character should be a fugitive from someone or something that presents a real inconvenience or danger for him when they meet.

Trapped In (variable)

Your character cannot leave a certain area without losing Character Points, either because she is duty bound to stay in some domain, or is prevented from leaving in some way. To leave would cost the character a number of Character Points equal to the value of this limitation. By making this limitation absolute, this limitation may be raised by one level. The area to which your character is confined is determined by the level of the limitation:

GdGood(+1)(10): One planet

GrGreat(+2)(15): One continent

OuOutstanding(+3)(20): One city

ExExtraordinary(+4)(30): One district / prefect / ward

PhPhenomenal(+5)(40): One building

Trapped Out (variable)

There are certain places your character simply cannot go into without losing Character Points, either due to moral, magical or power-related reasons. The number of Character Points lost per transgression equal the value of the limitation. This limitation may be raised by one level by making it absolute; nothing will allow your character to pass, he simply can’t get in. An example of this is the prohibition some vampires have against entering into houses uninvited.

— Table of Contents —

Sample Non-Player Characters (NPCsNon Player Characters)

Appendix V

Wild Kingdom

Alligator / Crocodile
1,151 Character Points
BBrawling AAgility SStrength EEndurance WWillpower IIntelligence PPerception RResourcefulness   RepReputation HPHealth Points SPStory Points
PrPoor(-1)(4) CmCommon(0)(6) OuOutstanding(+3)(20) GrGreat(+2)(15) WkWeak(-2)(2) WkWeak(-2)(2) WkWeak(-2)(2) DrDreadful(-3)(1)   DrDreadful(-3)(1) 45 7

Powers

  • Sharp Attack: OuOutstanding(+3)(20)
  • Speed: WkWeak(-2)(2), in the water
Bear
1,281 Character Points
BBrawling AAgility SStrength EEndurance WWillpower IIntelligence PPerception RResourcefulness   RepReputation HPHealth Points SPStory Points
GdGood(+1)(10) CmCommon(0)(6) OuOutstanding(+3)(20) OuOutstanding(+3)(20) WkWeak(-2)(2) WkWeak(-2)(2) PrPoor(-1)(4) DrDreadful(-3)(1)   DrDreadful(-3)(1) 56 9

Powers

  • Sharp Attack: OuOutstanding(+3)(20)
  • Speed: WkWeak(-2)(2)

Skills

  • (+1) bonus when making wrestling holds
Bird, Predatory
1,602 Character Points
BBrawling AAgility SStrength EEndurance WWillpower IIntelligence PPerception RResourcefulness   RepReputation HPHealth Points SPStory Points
GdGood(+1)(10) GdGood(+1)(10) PrPoor(-1)(4) Gr WkWeak(-2)(2) WkWeak(-2)(2) CmCommon(0)(6) DrDreadful(-3)(1)   DrDreadful(-3)(1) 39 11

Powers

  • Sharp Attack: PrPoor(-1)(4)
  • Enhanced Vision: GdGood(+1)(10)
  • Fly: CmCommon(0)(6)

This description can be used for eagles, hawks, and similar birds.

An owl will also have GoodGood(+1)(10) Night Sight (+522 points).

Bird, Song
390 Character Points
BBrawling AAgility SStrength EEndurance WWillpower IIntelligence PPerception RResourcefulness   RepReputation HPHealth Points SPStory Points
WkWeak(-2)(2) WkWeak(-2)(2) WkWeak(-2)(2) WkWeak(-2)(2) WkWeak(-2)(2) WkWeak(-2)(2) WkWeak(-2)(2) DrDreadful(-3)(1)   DrDreadful(-3)(1) 8 7

Powers

  • Fly: PrPoor(-1)(4)
Cat
928 Character Points
BBrawling AAgility SStrength EEndurance WWillpower IIntelligence PPerception RResourcefulness   RepReputation HPHealth Points SPStory Points
WkWeak(-2)(2) GdGood(+1)(10) WkWeak(-2)(2) WkWeak(-2)(2) WkWeak(-2)(2) WkWeak(-2)(2) CmCommon(0)(6) DrDreadful(-3)(1)   DrDreadful(-3)(1) 16 11

Powers

  • Sharp Attack: WkWeak(-2)(2)
  • Night Sight: GdGood(+1)(10)
Camel / Cow / Llama / Reindeer
22 Character Points
BBrawling AAgility SStrength EEndurance WWillpower IIntelligence PPerception RResourcefulness   RepReputation HPHealth Points SPStory Points
PrPoor(-1)(4) CmCommon(0)(6) GdGood(+1)(10) GrGreat(+2)(15) WkWeak(-2)(2) WkWeak(-2)(2) WkWeak(-2)(2) DrDreadful(-3)(1)   DrDreadful(-3)(1) 35 7

This description can be used for many types of herd animals.

Dog
1,595 Character Points
BBrawling AAgility SStrength EEndurance WWillpower IIntelligence PPerception RResourcefulness   RepReputation HPHealth Points SPStory Points
GdGood(+1)(10) CmCommon(0)(6) CmCommon(0)(6) GdGood(+1)(10) WkWeak(-2)(2) WkWeak(-2)(2) GdGood(+1)(10) DrDreadful(-3)(1)   DrDreadful(-3)(1) 32 15

Powers

  • Sharp Attack: CmCommon(0)(6)
  • Enhanced Smell: GrGreat(+2)(15)
  • Speed: WkWeak(-2)(2)
Dolphin
1,358 Character Points
BBrawling AAgility SStrength EEndurance WWillpower IIntelligence PPerception RResourcefulness   RepReputation HPHealth Points SPStory Points
GrGreat(+2)(15) GdGood(+1)(10) OuOutstanding(+3)(20) ExExtraordinary(+4)(30) PrPoor(-1)(4) CmCommon(0)(6) GdGood(+1)(10) DrDreadful(-3)(1)   DrDreadful(-3)(1) 75 21

Powers

  • Sense Sonar: GdGood(+1)(10)
  • Speed: PrPoor(-1)(4), in the water
Elephant
1,558 Character Points
BBrawling AAgility SStrength EEndurance WWillpower IIntelligence PPerception RResourcefulness   RepReputation HPHealth Points SPStory Points
GdGood(+1)(10) GdGood(+1)(10) ExExtraordinary(+4)(30) Ph;Phenomenal(+5)(40) WkWeak(-2)(2) WkWeak(-2)(2) WkWeak(-2)(2) DrDreadful(-3)(1)   DrDreadful(-3)(1) 100 7

Powers

  • Entangling Attack: ExExtraordinary(+4)(30) (trunk)
  • Sharp Attack: ExExtraordinary(+4)(30) (tusks)
Gorilla
120 Character Points
BBrawling AAgility SStrength EEndurance WWillpower IIntelligence PPerception RResourcefulness   RepReputation HPHealth Points SPStory Points
CmCommon(0)(6) GdGood(+1)(10) GrGreat(+2)(15) GrGreat(+2)(15) PrPoor(-1)(4) PrPoor(-1)(4) CmCommon(0)(6) DrDreadful(-3)(1)   DrDreadful(-3)(1) 46 15
Horse
712 Character Points
BBrawling AAgility SStrength EEndurance WWillpower IIntelligence PPerception RResourcefulness   RepReputation HPHealth Points SPStory Points
CmCommon(0)(6) GdGood(+1)(10) OuOutstanding(+3)(20) OuOutstanding(+3)(20) PrPoor(-1)(4) PrPoor(-1)(4) CmCommon(0)(6) DrDreadful(-3)(1)   DrDreadful(-3)(1) 56 15

Powers

  • Speed: CmCommon(0)(6)
Lion / Puma / Tiger
1,148 Character Points
BBrawling AAgility SStrength EEndurance WWillpower IIntelligence PPerception RResourcefulness   RepReputation HPHealth Points SPStory Points
GrGreat(+2)(15) GdGood(+1)(10) GdGood(+1)(10) GrGreat(+2)(15) WkWeak(-2)(2) WkWeak(-2)(2) CmCommon(0)(6) DrDreadful(-3)(1)   DrDreadful(-3)(1) 50 11

Powers

  • Sharp Attack: GdGood(+1)(10)
  • Speed: WkWeak(-2)(2)
Monkey
20 Character Points
BBrawling AAgility SStrength EEndurance WWillpower IIntelligence PPerception RResourcefulness   RepReputation HPHealth Points SPStory Points
CmCommon(0)(6) GdGood(+1)(10) PrPoor(-1)(4) GdGood(+1)(10) PrPoor(-1)(4) WkWeak(-2)(2) CmCommon(0)(6) DrDreadful(-3)(1)   DrDreadful(-3)(1) 30 13
Orca
1,338 Character Points
BBrawling AAgility SStrength EEndurance WWillpower IIntelligence PPerception RResourcefulness   RepReputation HPHealth Points SPStory Points
GdGood(+1)(10) CmCommon(0)(6) ExExtraordinary(+4)(30) ExExtraordinary(+4)(30) PrPoor(-1)(4) PrPoor(-1)(4) CmCommon(0)(6) DrDreadful(-3)(1)   DrDreadful(-3)(1) 76 15

Powers

  • Sense Sonar: CmCommon(0)(6)
  • Speed: PrPoor(-1)(4), in the water
Rhino
801 Character Points
BBrawling AAgility SStrength EEndurance WWillpower IIntelligence PPerception RResourcefulness   RepReputation HPHealth Points SPStory Points
GdGood(+1)(10) GdGood(+1)(10) OuOutstanding(+3)(20) ExExtraordinary(+4)(30) WkWeak(-2)(2) WkWeak(-2)(2) WkWeak(-2)(2) DrDreadful(-3)(1)   DrDreadful(-3)(1) 70 7

Powers

  • Sharp Attack: OuOutstanding(+3)(20)
Snake, Constrictor
114 Character Points
BBrawling AAgility SStrength EEndurance WWillpower IIntelligence PPerception RResourcefulness   RepReputation HPHealth Points SPStory Points
CmCommon(0)(6) CmCommon(0)(6) GrGreat(+2)(15) GrGreat(+2)(15) WkWeak(-2)(2) WkWeak(-2)(2) WkWeak(-2)(2) DrDreadful(-3)(1)   DrDreadful(-3)(1) 42 7

Skills

  • (+1) bonus when making wrestling holds
Snake, Venomous
462 Character Points
BBrawling AAgility SStrength EEndurance WWillpower IIntelligence PPerception RResourcefulness   RepReputation HPHealth Points SPStory Points
GdGood(+1)(10) PrPoor(-1)(4) WkWeak(-2)(2) Pr WkWeak(-2)(2) WkWeak(-2)(2) WkWeak(-2)(2) DrDreadful(-3)(1)   DrDreadful(-3)(1) 20 7

Powers

  • Poison Attack: GdGood(+1)(10)
Shark
1,315 Character Points
BBrawling AAgility SStrength EEndurance WWillpower IIntelligence PPerception RResourcefulness   RepReputation HPHealth Points SPStory Points
GdGood(+1)(10) GdGood(+1)(10) OuOutstanding(+3)(20) ExExtraordinary(+4)(30) WkWeak(-2)(2) WkWeak(-2)(2) PrPoor(-1)(4) DrDreadful(-3)(1)   DrDreadful(-3)(1) 70 9

Powers

  • Sharp Attack: OuOutstanding(+3)(20)
  • Speed: PrPoor(-1)(4), in the water
Wolf
2,262 Character Points
BBrawling AAgility SStrength EEndurance WWillpower IIntelligence PPerception RResourcefulness   RepReputation HPHealth Points SPStory Points
GrGreat(+2)(15) GdGood(+1)(10) GdGood(+1)(10) GdGood(+1)(10) WkWeak(-2)(2) WkWeak(-2)(2) GrGreat(+2)(15) DrDreadful(-3)(1)   DrDreadful(-3)(1) 45 20

Powers

  • Sharp Attack: GdGood(+1)(10)
  • Enhanced Smell: OuOutstanding(+3)(20)
  • Night Sight: GrGreat(+2)(15)
  • Speed: WkWeak(-2)(2)

— Table of Contents —

Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy

Aristocrat / Executive / Official
194+ Character Points
BBrawling AAgility SStrength EEndurance WWillpower IIntelligence PPerception RResourcefulness   RepReputation HPHealth Points SPStory Points
PrPoor(-1)(4) CmCommon(0)(6) CmCommon(0)(6) CmCommon(0)(6) PrPoor(-1)(4) GdGood(+1)(10) CmCommon(0)(6) GrGreat(+2)(15)   DrDreadful(-3)(1) 22 35

Skills

  • Profession: Government

    — or —

    Knowledge: Strategy

    — or —

    Psychology

    — or —

    Negotiation

  • One or more Language skills
Bard / Griot
256+ Character Points
BBrawling AAgility SStrength EEndurance WWillpower IIntelligence PPerception RResourcefulness   RepReputation HPHealth Points SPStory Points
PrPoor(-1)(4) CmCommon(0)(6) CmCommon(0)(6) CmCommon(0)(6) CmCommon(0)(6) GdGood(+1)(10) GdGood(+1)(10) WkWeak(-2)(2)   DrDreadful(-3)(1) 22 28

Skills

  • Knowledge: History (of a particular people)
  • Knowledge: Legends & Folklore (of a particular people)
  • Profession: Storyteller
  • One or more Language skills
Driver / Pilot
102 Character Points
BBrawling AAgility SStrength EEndurance WWillpower IIntelligence PPerception RResourcefulness   RepReputation HPHealth Points SPStory Points
PrPoor(-1)(4) GdGood(+1)(10) CmCommon(0)(6) CmCommon(0)(6) PrPoor(-1)(4) GdGood(+1)(10) CmCommon(0)(6) PrPoor(-1)(4)   DrDreadful(-3)(1) 26 24

Skills

  • One Vehicle skill
Doctor
316 Character Points
BBrawling AAgility SStrength EEndurance WWillpower IIntelligence PPerception RResourcefulness   RepReputation HPHealth Points SPStory Points
PrPoor(-1)(4) GdGood(+1)(10) CmCommon(0)(6) CmCommon(0)(6) GdGood(+1)(10) GrGreat(+2)(15) GdGood(+1)(10) GdGood(+1)(10)   DrDreadful(-3)(1) 26 45

Skills

  • Medicine
  • A Knowledge skill for an area of medical specialization
Fire Fighter
172 Character Points
BBrawling AAgility SStrength EEndurance WWillpower IIntelligence PPerception RResourcefulness   RepReputation HPHealth Points SPStory Points
PrPoor(-1)(4) GdGood(+1)(10) GdGood(+1)(10) GdGood(+1)(10) PrPoor(-1)(4) CmCommon(0)(6) CmCommon(0)(6) PrPoor(-1)(4)   DrDreadful(-3)(1) 34 20

Skills

  • First Aid
  • Profession: Firefighting
Government Agent / Spy
386 Character Points
BBrawling AAgility SStrength EEndurance WWillpower IIntelligence PPerception RResourcefulness   RepReputation HPHealth Points SPStory Points
GrGreat(+2)(15) GdGood(+1)(10) CmCommon(0)(6) GdGood(+1)(10) PrPoor(-1)(4) GdGood(+1)(10) GdGood(+1)(10) GdGood(+1)(10)   DrDreadful(-3)(1) 41 34

Skills

  • Firearms
  • Forgery

    — or —

    Lockpicking

  • Stealth
  • A Profession skill for a cover identity
Mechanic / Technician / Tradesman
74 Character Points
BBrawling AAgility SStrength EEndurance WWillpower IIntelligence PPerception RResourcefulness   RepReputation HPHealth Points SPStory Points
PrPoor(-1)(4) CmCommon(0)(6) CmCommon(0)(6) CmCommon(0)(6) PrPoor(-1)(4) CmCommon(0)(6) CmCommon(0)(6) CmCommon(0)(6)   DrDreadful(-3)(1) 22 22

Skills

  • Mechanic

    — or —

    a Profession skill

    — or —

    Programmer

Paramedic
152 Character Points
BBrawling AAgility SStrength EEndurance WWillpower IIntelligence PPerception RResourcefulness   RepReputation HPHealth Points SPStory Points
PrPoor(-1)(4) GdGood(+1)(10) CmCommon(0)(6) CmCommon(0)(6) PrPoor(-1)(4) GdGood(+1)(10) CmCommon(0)(6) PrPoor(-1)(4)   DrDreadful(-3)(1) 26 24

Skills

  • First Aid
  • Vehicle: Ambulance
Police Officer
184 Character Points
BBrawling AAgility SStrength EEndurance WWillpower IIntelligence PPerception RResourcefulness   RepReputation HPHealth Points SPStory Points
GdGood(+1)(10) GdGood(+1)(10) CmCommon(0)(6) GdGood(+1)(10) PrPoor(-1)(4) CmCommon(0)(6) CmCommon(0)(6) PrPoor(-1)(4)   DrDreadful(-3)(1) 36 20

Skills

  • Firearms
  • Profession: Law Enforcement
Scientist
196 Character Points
BBrawling AAgility SStrength EEndurance WWillpower IIntelligence PPerception RResourcefulness   RepReputation HPHealth Points SPStory Points
PrPoor(-1)(4) CmCommon(0)(6) CmCommon(0)(6) CmCommon(0)(6) GdGood(+1)(10) GrGreat(+2)(15) GdGood(+1)(10) GdGood(+1)(10)   DrDreadful(-3)(1) 22 45

Skills

  • A Knowledge skill for an area of scientific specialization
Shaman
1,358 Character Points
BBrawling AAgility SStrength EEndurance WWillpower IIntelligence PPerception RResourcefulness   RepReputation HPHealth Points SPStory Points
PrPoor(-1)(4) CmCommon(0)(6) CmCommon(0)(6) CmCommon(0)(6) GrGreat(+2)(15) GdGood(+1)(10) GdGood(+1)(10) GdGood(+1)(10)   DrDreadful(-3)(1) 22 45

Skills

  • Alchemy
  • Arcana
  • First Aid
  • Psychology

Powers

  • Magic: CmCommon(0)(6) (select six spells)
Soldier
214 Character Points
BBrawling AAgility SStrength EEndurance WWillpower IIntelligence PPerception RResourcefulness   RepReputation HPHealth Points SPStory Points
GrGreat(+2)(15) GdGood(+1)(10) CmCommon(0)(6) GdGood(+1)(10) PrPoor(-1)(4) CmCommon(0)(6) CmCommon(0)(6) PrPoor(-1)(4)   DrDreadful(-3)(1) 41 20

Skills

  • Archery

    — or —

    Firearms

  • Gunnery

    — or —

    Weapons: Blunt

    — or —

    Weapons: Sharp

Thief
264 Character Points
BBrawling AAgility SStrength EEndurance WWillpower IIntelligence PPerception RResourcefulness   RepReputation HPHealth Points SPStory Points
CmCommon(0)(6) GdGood(+1)(10) CmCommon(0)(6) CmCommon(0)(6) PrPoor(-1)(4) CmCommon(0)(6) GdGood(+1)(10) PrPoor(-1)(4)   DrDreadful(-3)(1) 28 24

Skills

  • Connoisseur
  • Lockpicking
  • Slight Of Hand
  • Stealth

— Table of Contents —

Index of Game Terms

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | K | L | M | N | O | P | R | S | T | V | W

A

Acceleration trait

action number

Action Roll (AR)

Age (Age, Height, Weight)

Agility trait

AR (Action Roll)

B

bonus (positive situation modifier)

booster, skill

booster, trait

Brawling trait

C

Capacity trait

challenge level

challenge modifier

chapter

Character Points

check

Contacts

contest

critical hit

D

Damage trait

Data Storage trait

defense result

defensive character

dice roll modifier (modifier)

E

Endurance trait

Evil Reputation trait

F

feat

G

Game Master (GM)

gear

Gender (Gender & Species)

GM (Game Master)

H

Health Points

Height (Age, Height, Weight)

Home Base

I

impact

Intelligence trait

K

knockback

knock out

L

level

M

magnitude (order of magnitude)

Material trait

modifier (dice roll modifier)

modifier, challenge

modifier, situation

modifier, situation, negative (penalty)

modifier, situation, positive (bonus)

modifier, trait

N

negative situation modifier (penalty)

Non Player Character (NPC)

NPC (Non Player Character)

O

offense result

offensive character

order of magnitude (magnitude)

P

PC (Player Character)

penalty (negative situation modifier)

Perception trait

Player Character (PC)

point value (value)

positive situation modifier (bonus)

power

Power Reserve trait

Power Source trait

Price trait

R

Reputation trait

Resourcefulness trait

result level

S

Signal Range trait

Simple Roll (SR)

situation modifier

situation modifier, negative (penalty)

situation modifier, positive (bonus)

skill

skill booster

Species (Gender & Species)

SR (Simple Roll)

Story

Story Points

Strength trait

T

trait

trait booster

trait modifier

turn

V

value (point value)

Visibility trait

W

Weight (Age, Height, Weight)

Weight trait

Willpower trait

— Table of Contents —

Closing Words

This work has a triple dedication:

First, to the real-life everyday women and men whose largely unsung heroics throughout human history earned them not accolades but insults, not medals but jail terms, not statues but unmarked graves; to those who were brave enough to be ahead of their time and do what was both unpopular and right.

Second, to everyone enriching human culture with various forms of open-source content.

Last but not least, to “my sweetest distraction”, Mi Querido John.

— Table of Contents —

 

Table of Contents

Opening Words

Introduction

The Game
The Basics
What You Need to Play
Traits & Levels

Table 1: Levels

Table 2: Dreadful Level

Orders of Magnitude

Table 3: Expanded Levels

When Worlds Collide
Rolling The Dice: Simple Rolls
Turns
Who Goes First
The Rest of the Rules

An Example of Play

Building Characters

Character Points
Character Traits
Health Points & Story Points

Table 4: Typical Modern-Day Humans

Table 5: Brawling

Table 6: Agility

Table 7: Strength

Table 8: Endurance

Table 9: Willpower

Table 10: Intelligence

Table 11: Perception

Table 12: Resourcefulness

Buying Levels of Traits
Buying Skills
Buying Gear
Buying Powers
Limitations
Unused Character Points
Half the Math is Done for You

Table 13: Character Point Costs

Filling in the Details
Optional Details

Action!

Rolling the Dice: The Action Roll

Table 14: Action Results

Checks
Contests
Details, Details
Determining Challenge Levels
Default Challenge Level
Automatic Success and Failure
“Pre-Actions”
Spending Story Points
Example Actions
Example Situation Modifiers

Table 15: Example Situation Modifiers

Example Challenge Levels

Table 16: Weight

Table 17: Material

Table 18: Acidity / Basicity

Table 19: Temperature

Table 20: Visibility

Table 21: Distance / Range

Table 22: Information

Table 23: Magnification

Table 24: Speed

Table 25: Slipperiness

Table 26: Fire

Table 27: Size / Volume

How Fast, How Long, How Far
Consequences
Combat Consequences

Table 28: Combat Consequences

Information-Gathering Consequences

Table 29: Information-Gathering Consequences

More Consequences
Getting Hurt
Getting Hit
Poison and Radiation
Extreme Temperatures and Pollution
Vacuum, Extreme Pressure, and No Air
Fire, Ice, Electricity, Acid, and Other Things That Hurt
Getting Better (or Not)
Going, going, gone

Improving Characters

Earning Character Points

Table 30: Earning Character Points

Earning Reputation

Table 31: Earning Reputation Levels

When Improvements Take Effect
Negative Character Points
Negative Reputation Levels

Gear

Gear Traits
It’s Broke
It’s Alive?
It’s You, Only Better
Lending Power
Types of Gear
Armor
Weapons
Computers
Vehicles
Kits
Pricing Gear
Building Gear

Table 32: Building Consequences

Special Requirements
Repairing Gear
Buying Gear
So What Now?

Gear Descriptions

Skill Descriptions

Power Descriptions

Table 33: Spell Durations

Limitation Descriptions

Sample Non-Player Characters (NPCs)

Index of Game Terms

Closing Words

Frequently Asked Questions

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